Two out of three

October 20, 2014

Spotted on a sign:

We offer three kinds of service:

GOOD – CHEAP – FAST

You can pick any two but:

GOOD service CHEAP won’t be FAST

GOOD service FAST won’t be CHEAP

FAST service CHEAP won’t be GOOD


GDT index up 1.4%

October 16, 2014

GlobalDairyTrade’s price index rose 1.4% in this morning’s auction.

That is welcome news after the big fall in the index at the previous auction.


Wool levy vote lost

October 14, 2014

Preliminary results show wool growers have voted against a levy.

New Zealand wool growers look to have declined the opportunity for a new Wool Commodity Levy Order to be introduced following a Referendum which closed on Friday 10 October.

“Preliminary results show the result is against the introduction of a levy. Final votes are yet to be counted, as some voting envelopes are still in transit and will be processed until Wednesday, however it seems unlikely the outcome will change now,” said Sandra Faulkner, Chair of the Wool Levy Group.

As at Tuesday 14 October, wool growers voted 43.2% to 56.8% against the levy while the weighted vote from larger enterprises was against the levy 40.29% to 59.71%. . .

“Our challenge was to ensure that wool growers understood the proposal to introduce a levy under the Commodities Levy Act and get a strong voter turnout,” says Sandra Faulkner, Chair of the Wool Levy Group.

“We are delighted with voter turnout of around 47% – most commodity levy act votes struggle to get over 35%. Wool growers have certainly seen the importance of getting involved in this event – I can only reiterate my sincere thanks to all those who took the time to read the proposal, ask questions and vote.

“Growers have elected to operate in a purely commercial environment and there will be some disappointment that this continues to see our $700 million wool industry without an independent, internationally recognised, non-commercial voice.

“However, the significant involvement in the conversation around this proposal and ultimately, in the future of our wool industry, from growers through to end use retailers, researchers and educators, across all wool types, has certainly been encouraging.” . . .

When more affluent customers are looking for greener options, wool ought to seek itself.

It is a natural, renewable product sourced from free-range animals.

A levy would have helped get that message through to more customers.


Over priced and under-proven

October 13, 2014

New Zealand shoppers think environmentally friendly products are over priced:

Even green-leaning Kiwis think environmentally-friendly products are overpriced

Whether you’re a climate change sceptic, a tree-hugging eco-warrior or something in between, there’s no avoiding the environmental debate these days. And with nearly four out of five New Zealanders believing that ‘if we don’t act now we’ll never control our environmental problems’, it makes sense that their shopping habits would reflect this. After all, buying sustainable, eco, biodegradable, non-toxic and/or organic products is an easy way for each individual to play their part in saving the planet, right?

Perhaps not. You see, there’s one small problem: three-quarters of Kiwis also believe that ‘environmentally friendly products are overpriced’ (compared to 68% of Australians). This presents a challenge for retailers and manufacturers of such items.

Roy Morgan Research looked at the customers of several high-profile New Zealand retailers to see how their attitudes towards environmentally friendly products stacked up against the national average. . . .

It’s not just the price I question, it’s the claims to being environmentally friendly.

Sustainable, eco, biodegradable, non-toxic, recycled, recyclable and organic are used separately and together on many products but how do we know they really are as good as they claim?

Are they really green or are the manufacturers and producers just using green wash as a marketing ploy?

Some so-called environmentally friendly products aren’t just over-priced, they’re under-proven.


Get back to me

October 12, 2014


Why agriculture matters

October 10, 2014

 

It’s more than ironic that opposition parties which like to think they champion the poor everywhere and might appreciate the value of agriculture in developing countries don’t appreciate what is does – economically, socially and environmentally in New Zealand.

Perhaps they’re suffering from a particularly ignorant form of NIMBYism.

 


Nearly 1 in 10 want to quit dairy

October 7, 2014

Almost 1 in 10 dairy farmers are considering getting out of the industry:

According to DairyCo’s Farmer Intentions Survey, milk producers have lost confidence in the industry over the past year, with 9% planning to quit within the next two years.

This is in Britain, not New Zealand.

Only 32% of 1,230 UK respondents planned to increase production over the next couple of years, compared to 36% at the same time last year. “There was a noticeable increase in the proportion of farmers who were undecided on production levels two years hence, up from 5% in 2012 to 13% this year,” said the report. “This is likely to be a response to the difficulties faced during the 2012-13 milk year and the continued uncertainty on operating conditions for the upcoming year.” . . .

The high level of uncertainty meant 36% of farmers were undecided on investment plans for the next five years, up from 12% in last year’s survey. The number planning to invest nothing over the next five years increased from 12% to 29% over the same period. . . .

The forecast payout for the current season here is uncomfortably close to break-even for most farmers here.

But in spite of that the industry is in a much healthier state than it is in the UK and the medium to long term outlook is good.


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