Saturday soapbox

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, to muse or amuse – and to support #gigatownoamaru .

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17 Responses to Saturday soapbox

  1. Andrei says:

    Don’t people use pressure cookers anymore?

    Our trusty old one, which had served well for more years than I care to admit needed a new gasket, an impossible thing to find and the only real option was to replace it

    Hah – Electric pressure cookers with star trek control panels are available but to find one you can stick of the gas turned into a bit of a mission but one that has been accomplished,

    So are pressure cookers out of fashion and if so why?

    They are after all a green, energy saving and wholesome way to cook

  2. homepaddock says:

    My mother used one for years. My brothers and I liked to try to make it blow it’s top but I don’t own one and in spite of the attributes you list, don’t want to.

    Memories of food I didn’t like but had to eat as a child put me off.

  3. Armchair Critic says:

    Thanks for the quote Ele, it helped me work out something that had been been irking me.
    I’d had a sense of disquiet about the PM going to Nelson Mandela’s funeral. Usually I’d have no qualms, but in this instance I do, and your quote illustrates why very well. If the PM could remember where he stood on the springbok tour, and admit it, I could see him on either the right or wrong side of history. Jim Bolger, a PM I voted for, was big enough to admit he got it wrong. His fence sitting on what was a pivotal part of NZ’s history makes him unready to represent the country at the funeral.

  4. homepaddock says:

    He does and he has.

    He’s said that he wasn’t against the tours at the time but with hindsight thinks he was wrong. He has said this publicly and it’s been reported but still the incorrect version that he can’t remember persists.

    Keep in mind he was only a student late teens/early 20s at the time. While the issue was very important to a lot of people it wasn’t to everyone, especially younger people.

    He is going as the PM representing New Zealand, it would be insulting not to.

  5. Gravedodger says:

    Many of those who suggest Mr Key has been evasive on the Tour seem to have no problem in accepting that Ms Clark had no idea her car was speeding.

    Now I know people who had no opinion on the tour but to find a person with no appreciation of the dynamic of a vehicle travelling up to 180kph does stretch credibility.

    Hell a m8 who has travelled in Concorde said there was a distinct aura of speed at mach2+

  6. Richard says:

    NZ Post: Interesting article in the NZ Herald:
    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11168422

    and a followup in Kiwiblog

    Jim Anderton’s Kiwi Bank is being subsidized by NZ Post- hurrying its downfall.

  7. Andrei says:

    For goodness sakes AC John Key was 19 years old when that happened, it is ancient history.

    Have you seen Invictus by the way? One of Hollywoods better efforts and one that has Jonah Lomu is a minor character in the drama

  8. TraceyS says:

    I have never used one, but made good use of a crock pot when we were both working very long hours getting home at 10.30pm at night. It was nice to have dinner there waiting for us.

    Fast cooked food tends to have more of the bad stuff in it – sugar, fat, additives etc. Slow cooking lets flavours develop and so a lot of that isn’t needed. Perhaps slow cooking could help deal with this massive looming problem…

    “Since calorific foods are known to impair our body’s response to insulin, we may be unwittingly poisoning our brains every time we chow down on burgers and fries. People with type 2 diabetes, who have already developed insulin resistance, may be particularly at risk. “The epidemic of type 2 diabetes, if it continues on its current trajectory, is likely to be followed by an epidemic of dementia,” says Ewan McNay of the University at Albany in New York. “That’s going to be a huge challenge to the medical and care systems.”

    “115m people globally will get Alzheimer’s by 2050″

    http://www.sott.net/article/250689-Food-for-thought-Eat-your-way-to-dementia-Sugar-and-Carbs-Cause-Alzheimer-s-Disease

    It was good to see a politician, Michael Woodhouse, noting the importance of eating well in today’s ODT (no online link available). We need politicians with good brains!

    There is also a very good article on dietary fibre:
    http://www.odt.co.nz/lifestyle/health-fitness/284233/are-you-eating-right-fibre

  9. Andrei says:

    “115m people globally will get Alzheimer’s by 2050″

    Yes and it is due to “calorific foods” as well but not for the reason the over indulged, over paid, worthless ninnies from the chattering class will try and tell you.

    No, a regular supply of good food, means people are living longer and instead of dying worn out in their forties they are now making it into their eighties in ever higher numbers and thus we are seeing more of the degenerative diseases of old age than we used too.

    We actually need “calorific foods” to fuel our bodies and this is particularly true for those who do physical work unlike mediocre academics and politicians whose stock in trade is bullshit and who whizzle on about these things (on the tax payers dime usually).

    We are all doomed to die one way or another, you pays your money and takes your chances but something is gonna get you sooner or later and a diet of mung beans and tofu aint going to save you, in fact being constrained to such a diet might make premature death seem welcome.

  10. TraceyS says:

    It is still a huge challenge no matter how you look at it. More advanced medical care is also helping people to live longer. The number of people suffering from dementia will put a strain on that same system.

    You may be interested to know that some studies have shown a diet limited in calories can actually prolong life. I haven’t mastered that yet, but do manage to burn up most of the calories from a reasonably high calorie diet.

  11. Andrei says:

    It is still a huge challenge no matter how you look at it. More advanced medical care is also helping people to live longer. The number of people suffering from dementia will put a strain on that same system.

    You are preaching to the choir Tracey – anybody who is half aware realizes we have a major demographic problem sourced from the fact that we do not understand the life cycle of the human being and have extended childhood into the twenties or even thirties while at the same time are we living longer,

    Perhaps 45% of a modern western human beings life span is spent being dependent on others one way or another – the situation is unstable or to coin a phrase “unsustainable”.

    You may be interested to know that some studies have shown a diet limited in calories can actually prolong life.

    More ivory tower bullshit – the human being needs energy to function, without taking in the energy to accomplish the necessary tasks of everyday life we DIE.

    We do have the ability to store surplus energy in times of plenty to see us through (hopefully) in times of dearth and when this is depleted we start to cannibalize our own bodies to keep us going (hopefully) until we can replenish our reserves but even today people die of undernourishment, just like cars stop going when the petrol tank gets empty.

    One of the funniest things I read of was how the US military sent a dietary expert ninny to a base where they were doing advanced infantry training – She was horrified by the food on offer in the mess and made the cooks change the menu according to her view of what was “healthy”. There was nearly a riot but she persisted until the guys became unable to meet the physical demands being placed upon them.

    See if you are going to be asked to make a 50 mile runs in sub zero temperatures carrying an infantry mans full kit etc you need more than “healthy green salads” to sustain you – it takes fatty pork chops and deep fried potatoes etc to provide the necessary fuel :)

  12. TraceyS says:

    “See if you are going to be asked to make a 50 mile runs in sub zero temperatures carrying an infantry mans full kit etc you need more than “healthy green salads” to sustain you – it takes fatty pork chops and deep fried potatoes etc to provide the necessary fuel.”

    How many people in this country have those sort of calorific demands? Healthy green salads and lots of fibre are really important for people who are living quite sedentary lives. Call them “mediocre” if you wish, but they still exist in large numbers.

    I’m off home to my paua patties and new potatoes with plenty of butter.

  13. Andrei says:

    How many people in this country have those sort of calorific demands?

    It doesn’t matter how many there are, Tracey, just that there are some because they go to demonstrate that silly women from ivory towers are CLUELESS when it comes to the realities that people who dwell outside their bubble face.

    And they take it upon themselves to try and dictate that everybody should enjoy the diet of an emaciated rabbit

  14. TraceyS says:

    And you are under no compulsion to follow their advice.

    But it is something to think about given that:

    “In New Zealand alone, 48,000 people were diagnosed with dementia in 2011, and the number was expected to triple to 147,500 by 2050.”

    http://www.odt.co.nz/news/dunedin/260176/call-prepare-dementia-epidemic

    If diabetes is “pre-alzheimers” as some studies are beginning to suggest, that figure could be much larger considering this:

    “18% of adults have pre-diabetes”

    http://www.odt.co.nz/campus/university-otago/247724/18-adults-have-pre-diabetes-study

    I consider that this problem may, in future, dwarf present-day concerns over climate change. Will we even remember that there was such a concern?

  15. Andrei says:

    Yes Tracey – this bee you have in your bonnet is one of the symptoms of a society and Nation that is in the process of committing suicide.

    But what can we do? – we will continue to murder 16000+ infants a year in our hospitals, promote un-natural non procreative sex acts as normal, undermine parents and parenting with insane social policies and encourage family breakdown. And thus the children we need to replenish our nation will not be born and the population will age stagnate and die

    When you look hard at our parliament and our elites you quickly come to realize the lunatics have taken over the asylum

  16. Armchair Critic says:

    It was a long time ago, Andrei, and while it certainly is history, it is an important part of history.
    I have seen Invictus and if I hadn’t had to see the bit where NZ lost the RWC final, I would have liked the whole movie.

  17. Armchair Critic says:

    Indeed, he has to go.
    I had an opinion on the tour at the time, just as everyone I knew had an opinion. I was nine, so the idea that someone ten years older than me was too young to have an opinion on such a polarizing issue is laughable.

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