Rural round-up

Fonterra Confirms No Health Risk with High School Project:

Fonterra today confirmed that there is no health risk to students at Palmerston North Girls’ High School who drank drinks that included whey protein concentrate (WPC80) from a batch subsequently subject to the recent precautionary recall.

Fonterra visited the school today to work with the principal and teachers as they informed students and parents about the whey protein concentrate provided to the school. The Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Health have also been involved in supporting the school.

Fonterra Chief Technology Officer Dr Jeremy Hill said Fonterra established last night that a small portion of some potentially affected whey protein concentrate was provided to the school in February 2013. . .

Landcorp 2013 profit probably higher than forecast as it mitigates drought impact - Tina Morrison:

Landcorp Farming, New Zealand’s biggest farmer, says earnings may be a smidgen higher than first budgeted after initially thinking it may only breakeven this year when drought hit milk production and livestock price.

Net operating profit was probably $13 million in the year ended June 30, compared with its original budget of $12.7 million and down from $27 million the year earlier, state-owned Landcorp said in a statement

In January, the company, which operates 119 properties, cut its earnings expectations to between $6 million and $8 million and in March said it may only breakeven as the worst drought in 70 years crimped production and hit prices. . . .

New salmon farms get the go ahead:

New Zealand King Salmon got the go ahead yesterday for four new salmon farms in the Marlborough Sounds, when two appeals to the High Court were completely dismissed.

New Zealand King Salmon CEO Grant Rosewarne says he and his team are extremely relieved. He says “I am hugely proud of my team, and their absolute commitment through what has been an exhausting process. But we’re very excited and eager to get on with the business of producing the world’s best salmon”.

Once operational, the four new farms will create about 200 new jobs in the Top of the South, and benefits will start to flow through wages and additional work for local suppliers such as water taxis, engineering firms, transport companies and local shops. . .

Government welcomes King Salmon decision:

Conservation Minister Dr Nick Smith and Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy have welcomed the High Court’s decision to dismiss two appeals on the Board of Inquiry’s approval for New Zealand King Salmon to develop new marine farms in the Marlborough Sounds.

The decision of the Board of Inquiry, reached in February 2011, to approve four new salmon farming sites in the Marlborough Sounds was appealed by two parties and that appeal was heard at the High Court in Blenheim in May.

“The impacts of these new marine farms on the important recreation and conservation values of the Marlborough Sounds are small. This is about use of only six hectares of more than 100,000 hectares of water space in the Sounds,” Dr Smith says. . .

Sanford to miss forecast on lower skipjack tuna, toothfish and mussel harvest - Tina Morrison:

Sanford, New Zealand’s largest listed fishing company, said annual profit will fall short of its forecast after lower catches of skipjack tuna and toothfish and slow growth in its main Marlborough mussel growing area. The shares fell.

Profit will probably be $23 million to $25 million in the year ending Sept. 30, from $21 million last year, the Auckland-based company said in a statement. That’s less than Sanford forecast in May when it said second half profit would probably match the $14 million posted in the first half.

Sanford profits are being crimped as it faces high costs of operating its vessels while its catches fail to meet expectations in the Pacific skipjack tuna fishery and for toothfish in the remote South Georgia fishing zone. Slower growth in Marlborough mussels means those that are able to be harvested are generally smaller, resulting in lower revenue per kilogram and increased production costs. . .

Long haul to first consent for water scheme:

The company driving a large-scale irrigation and water storage scheme in North Canterbury hopes to have the initial stage operating in two or three years, now that it has got its first resource consent.

The $400 million scheme will take water mainly from the Hurunui River to irrigate up to 60,000 hectares of land on several hundred properties extending from north of the river to the coast. A series of dams will be built on a tributary of the Hurunui, the Waitohi, for water storage as well as hydro power.

Project manager Amanda Loeffen says it has been a long haul to get the first consent; initially the scheme wasn’t supported by everybody, and after a year and a half of discussions it has been completely redesigned. . .

Pins Colt Attracts Top Price at South Island Sale:

A striking colt by top-drawer stallion Pins has topped the New Zealand Bloodstock South Island Sale of Two-Year-Olds and Mixed Bloodstock, knocked down for $50,000.

Presented at Lot 29 from the draft of Phoenix Park, the colt is out of the 2005/06 New Zealand Bloodstock Southern Filly of the Year Series winner Ombre Rose and is bred on the Waikato Stud cross of Pins over O’Reilly that has proven successful in the past.

The hammer fell in favour of Joe Barnes of J & I Bloodstock Ltd, with the colt’s racing future likely to be in Hong Kong. . .

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