Saturday soapbox

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation.

You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, to muse or amuse.

:) kindest, Boris

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9 Responses to Saturday soapbox

  1. tiffany267 says:

    LOL I love the Mark Twain quote.

    So, here’s my special news for the Homepaddock readers, actually relevant to NZ for a change:

    http://tiffany267.wordpress.com/2013/05/27/us-spy-device-tested-on-nz-public-nz-herald

    What are your thoughts, folks?

    And, something less horrifying and actually fun for once:

    http://tiffany267.wordpress.com/2013/05/28/5-recycled-buildings-wing-house-sea-fort-resort-and-more-places-that-will-blow-your-mind-photos

  2. TraceyS says:

    An article published this month in the British Medical Journal said one in five US children experience a mental disorder each year (http://www.bmj.com/content/346/bmj.f3281).

    In New Zealand, our figures (provided they are collected on the same basis), are a lot lower – just 3.2% (http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/number-anxious-kids-skyrockets-5312650).

    However, this number has nearly doubled over a five year period. So are we headed in the same direction as the US?

    In both the US and NZ over-diagnosis has been suggested.

    “Now a lack of concentration is a conduct disorder. Parents are scared their children are not going to function at school so they accept these labels.”

    I think that is a worrisome trend.

    Perhaps Tiffany can add something from the US perspective?

  3. TraceyS says:

    If some one wants to spy on my emails and phone calls I think they would be bored stiff!

    With technology available these days, and the skills of hackers, I guess anyone could do it to me if they really wanted to.

    That’s the world we are living in. I know some people who don’t trust email because of this reality. It’s really not 100% personal, but most of imagine it to be.

  4. TraceyS says:

    *of us*

  5. Andrei says:

    Perhaps it is because the once great Nation of the USA has lost its marbles – just a thought

  6. Andrei says:

    Matthew 19:5-65 And said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife: and they twain shall be one flesh?

    6 Wherefore they are no more twain, but one flesh. What therefore God hath joined together, let not man put asunder.

  7. tiffany267 says:

    *tries to ignore Andrei’s religious hand-wringing*

    I can’t necessarily speak for the entire U.S., but my personal opinion is that many mental disorders aren’t really a disorder at all. I personally believe that the entire psychiatric industry shouldn’t exist, per se.

    If someone has a legitimate mental problem, then a neuroscientist should be able to trace it to a hormonal imbalance, a particular brain dysfunction or injury, or some other scientifically verifiable physiological cause. If the only means for diagnosis is talking to a shrink, that’s not medicine, it’s not science, and it’s not a legitimate disorder.

    I think that it’s child abuse to have a child labeled with ADHD in order to make them take medications for behaviors for which there is no medically known cause. Try parenting for a change, folks.

    That having been said, I do think that any drug should be available OTC, regardless of whether or not it is intended for mental stability. The entire prescription drug system is an enormous hoax. It may sound bizarre to you, but I haven’t been to a physician in about three years (though I’ve been to an out-of-pocket Chinese medicine practitioner more recently than that). The last time I went to a physician, I was under duress from the person I lived with at the time, who insisted that I see a doctor for my sniffle, even though it was plainly obvious that it was derived from allergies having moved to a new area with different allergic irritants (in the summertime at that). So, I had to find a doctor, schedule an appointment on their time, come in, wait with a bunch of actually sick people, finally get called in by a nurse, who asked me a bunch of obvious questions, to finally see a doctor for perhaps five minutes, who prescribed me OTC allergy pills – precisely what I already knew I needed and could have bought on my own. All I did was line the pockets of insurance companies and the nonmedical staff at the physician’s office, with no improvement to my health.

    People who think they suffer from ADHD have a natural right to purchase whatever drug they think makes them stable on a free market without being required to show a prescription from a physician, just the same as people with a cold. The fact that this country makes us prove we are qualified to buy medicine is perverse to every notion of freedom.

    There’s a major problem in this country and that is the stigmatization of transgender people. There is bad enough discrimination and social stigma without the added medical stigma attached to their situation. You see, in the U.S. at least, being transgender is still considered a mental disorder, and in order for a transgender person to seek any form of treatment they are required to be diagnosed with a mental disorder known as “gender dysphoria”, which would give them access to possible prescriptions for treatment. Let me give you some context – in the U.S. being gay was seen as a mental disorder for decades, and suddenly without any explanation or apology for years of calling gays insane, the psychological community just sort of changed its mind. Labeling people with mental disorders in the U.S. is a terrific form of social control, particularly with regard to enforcing conservative gender roles.

    If you’re still not convinced that the entire psychiatric industry should be scrapped along with most mental disorder diagnoses, check these out:

    http://tiffany267.wordpress.com/2013/05/06/the-real-problems-with-psychiatry-hope-reese-the-atlantic (This one is definitely the most helpful and the most important)

    http://tiffany267.wordpress.com/2013/05/18/inventor-of-adhd-on-his-deathbed-says-it-is-a-fictitious-condition

    http://tiffany267.wordpress.com/2013/05/11/why-anti-authoritarians-are-diagnosed-as-mentally-ill

  8. tiffany267 says:

    With all due respect, I see an enormous difference between being hacked unwittingly by a private citizen and being knowingly spied on by an institution which exists by virtue of stealing your own money and monopolizing the use of force.

  9. TraceyS says:

    Very interesting Tiffany. I do not find it at all strange that you haven’t seen a physician in three years.

    My daughter is eight and she was de-registered from our PHO because she hasn’t been to a doctor in so long. This means if I take her to the doctor now, the clinic won’t get any government funding to cover the visit! I took her for chicken-pox at age four but the doctor would not see her. Didn’t even come out to the waiting room to have a look! He was too busy and wasn’t worried about her condition – no doubt due to her being such a healthy child. She has never needed antibiotics nor any other medication. My son is 11 and has only had antibiotics once, when he was nine months old.

    When my first child was a baby, a Public Health Nurse told me that he felt if children were raised on food from the outer ring of the supermarket (ie. in NZ that’s all the perishable food; meat, dairy, fresh veg, bread etc) then they generally didn’t need medicines for health. I started doing research and changing shopping habits. One book that influenced me was “In Defense of Food” by Pollan. He said that typically 70% of the dollars spent at the supermarket was on packaging and advertising. We didn’t have much money at the time, so I changed and it made an enormous difference.

    But I cannot agree that medicines should be freely available. Especially in the case of antibiotics which are already overused to the detriment of people and the environment. Other medicines are dangerous in other ways.

    My niece has a medical condition and has antibiotics on hand at all times and can get them easily. This is an exception I guess – for someone who has an exceptional need.

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