Word of the day

June 30, 2013

Pablum – naive, trite, insipid, or simplistic entertainment, intellectual fare, writing, speech, or conceptualisation; pap.


Rural round-up

June 30, 2013

Fine For Dirty Gumboot Passenger:

The air passenger said the gumboots were clean; the goat manure and the snail said otherwise…

Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) border staff issued the French passenger with a $400 fine earlier this month for failing to declare biosecurity risk goods when he arrived at Auckland airport on a flight from Papua New Guinea.

The passenger initially said he had scrubbed the boots with bleach. On inspection they were found to be contaminated with manure from a goat farm. An MPI quarantine inspector found the snail inside the boots when cleaning them. . .

Lincoln University student develops time and money saving device for farmers:

Second year Bachelor of Commerce (Agriculture) student Brendan Herries has developed a dual vaccination gun that will have many benefits for farmers; a device which has earned him the 2013 Fieldays Innovation Grassroots merit award.

From spending time in the yards injecting stock with two vaccines or minerals, Brendan witnessed first-hand the inefficiency of having to run the stock through the stock race twice or needing two employees vaccinating at a time. . .

Record turnout for CPW workshops:

Central Plains Water Ltd had a record turnout to its series of workshops with nearly 500 in total attending the four workshops, including nearly 300 to the final briefing at Darfield.

Derek Crombie, CEO of CPWL, said he was greatly encouraged by the large turnout, and blown away by the numbers who came to the final workshop in Darfield.

“At the start of the evening we only put out about 100 chairs and we had to keep adding

New Agreement Cements Nelson-based Aquaculture Partnership:

Aquaculture in the Top of the South has received a further boost following the signing of a formal agreement between Cawthron Institute and Wakatū Incorporation this week.

“This new partnership represents a long-term investment in the aquaculture sector and symbolises an ongoing commitment by Cawthron Institute and Wakatū to economic development in the Nelson Tasman region,” Cawthron Institute Chairman Ian Kearney says.

“By working together at a strategic level we’re able to better pool our resources and knowledge so we can continue to support the sustainable growth of aquaculture in the Top of the South.” . .

until the Darfield Community Hall was full,” he said. . .

Mobile Technology a Key to Primary Industry Growth:

New Zealand’s primary industries have built a strong international reputation for innovation, product development and forward thinking. While these characteristics are still strong, emerging new tools t to improve productivity and efficiencies within each industry are mobile communications technologies. Mobile is the new buzz word within the primary sector – and for good reason. Mobile technologies are offering a true leap forward in how businesses operate and remain competitive within the fast-paced global marketplace.

Over the past week, as the Government looks to auction off radio spectrum for 4G mobile services, Federated Farmers have strongly recommended that these new high speed networks should also be rolled out to rural areas. . .

Yealands Wine Group secures 21 medals at the Spiegelau International Wine Awards

Yealands Wine Group has built upon recent success with another impressive result at the Spiegelau International Wine Competition. 21 medals were awarded to the group across the Yealands Estate, Peter Yealands, Crossroads and The Crossings ranges.

The medal haul includes two gold and eight silver medals. Peter Yealands, Founder of Yealands Wine Group, says the awards are a testament to the hard work from across the Yealands Wine Group.  . .


6 ideas to re-connect a generation

June 30, 2013

Being unemployed at any age is undesirable but youth unemployment is even more of a problem.

Having a job and learning the generic skills that come with doing it properly even with an unskilled job help make young people more employable.

Going from school on to a benefit rather than into further education, training or a job, make young people less employable and the longer they’re not working the more difficult it is for them to get,a nd keep, a job.

Kevin Roberts observes that young people without jobs are at risk of becoming disconnected from society and he offers six ideas to help re-connect them:

  • Partner more schools with local businesses, trade academies, and universities
  • Run career days for every age from 11 up
  • Introduce entrepreneurial skills as a subject in primary schools
  • Create start-up hubs that provide free internet access and basic business amenities for young graduates starting out
  • Cities should run competitions that challenge youth to find solutions to civic problems
  • Sing together. Singing keeps your spirits up, elevates parts of you that don’t often get to rise up. And you could be a YouTube phenomenon.

Having a job doesn’t necessarily mean working for someone else.

The Fieldays provided an opportunity for a young entrepreneur to show age isn’t a barrier to innovation:

. . . 12-year-old Patrick Roskram of Matamata, made an enthusiastic pitch to the Innovation Den panel about his invention; the fencing tool Gudgeon Pro 4in1. Patrick’s passionate speech was recognised by Dr Ray Thompson, Chair of the Angel’s Association NZ, who awarded the $1000 Best Pitch Award to the young finalist saying it was a stand-out presentation. Patrick also won a marketing pack from Vodafone’s Darren Hopper who offered time with their creative agency in Auckland. However, the icing on the cake for the young inventor was a personal invitation from Sir William Gallagher for the 12-year-old to have an internship at Gallagher’s Research and Development department during his school holidays.

Sir William Gallagher joined a surprised Patrick on stage as he finished his presentation. Sir William congratulated Patrick on his pitch, giving him a triple A for enthusiasm.

“You’ve certainly got a solution for the New Zealand market and I can see an opportunity for it. There’s some homework to do but I’m certain you can come up with a product that can go into shops.”

Patrick later said it was all “pretty awesome” and it had always been a dream of his to speak to Sir William and that he had lots of other ideas up his sleeve. . . .

It would be a safe bet that someone with this sort of initiative and ability at that age won’t be troubled by unemployment.


And the bride wore wool

June 30, 2013

When we grow it we should use it but we don’t all go as far as wearing it to our own weddings:

And the bride wore white – long, curly white strands of wool.

Louise Fairburn, who is an award-winning sheep breeder, decided to get married in a fleece from her own flock.

She designed the gown and took wool from her favourite rare Lincoln Longwool, Olivia.

And she extended the theme to the rest of her big day, putting her groom Ian, 42, in a waistcoat made from wool.

Mrs Fairburn even carried a Bo Peep-style crook and the ring bearer’s cushion was made from a fleece.

Guests were given chocolate sheep-shaped favours and even dined on lamb dishes by celebrity chef Rachel Green. . .

What do you think of this wonderful wedding dress? It was handmade out of fleece from her own flock - isn't it special? http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1205007/Shepherdess-bride-marries-stunning-dress-wool-flock.html

More photos and details on how the dress was made can be found by clicking the link above.


If one council can do it . . .

June 30, 2013

Queenstown Lakes District Council has voted for an average overall rates increase of 0% and mayor, Vanessa van Uden, says it’s sustainable.

The council has a relatively small but rapidly growing population and a larger proportion than average of absentee owners.

If it can cater for its residents and future needs with a sustainable zero percent rates rise, why can’t other councils follow this good example, or at least keep increases to below the rate of inflation?


Sunday soapbox

June 30, 2013

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation.

You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, to muse or amuse.


June 30 in history

June 30, 2013

350 Roman usurper Nepotianus, of the Constantinian dynasty, was defeated and killed by troops of the usurper Magnentius.

1422  Battle of Arbedo between the duke of Milan and the Swiss cantons.

1520  The Spaniards were expelled from Tenochtitlan.

1559  King Henry II of France was seriously injured in a jousting match against Gabriel de Montgomery.

1651 The Deluge: Khmelnytsky Uprising – the Battle of Beresteczko ended with a Polish victory.

1688  The Immortal Seven issued the Invitation to William, continuing the struggle for English independence from Rome.

1758  Seven Years’ War: The Battle of Domstadtl.

1794 Native American forces under Blue Jacket attacked Fort Recovery.

1859  French acrobat Charles Blondin crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope.

1860  The 1860 Oxford evolution debate at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

1864 U.S. President Abraham Lincoln granted Yosemite Valley to California for “public use, resort and recreation”.

1882  Charles J. Guiteau was hanged for the assassination of President James Garfield.

1886 The first transcontinental train trip across Canada departs from Montreal.

1905 Albert Einstein published the article “On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies”, in which he introduced special relativity.

1906  The United States Congress passed the Meat Inspection Act and Pure Food and Drug Act.
 
1908 – Winston Graham, British writer, was born (d. 2003).

1908  The Tunguska explosion in SIberia – commonly believed to have been caused by the air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an altitude of 5–10 kilometres (3.1–6.2 mi) above the Earth’s surface.

1912  The Regina Cyclone hit Regina, Saskatchewan, killing 28.

1917 -  Susan Hayward, American actress, was born (d. 1975).

1917 – Lena Horne, American singer and actress (d. 2010)

1934  The Night of the Long Knives, Adolf Hitler’s violent purge of his political rivals took place.

1935  The Senegalese Socialist Party held its first congress.

1936  Emperor Haile Selassie of Abbysinia appealled for aid to the League of Nations against Mussolini’s invasion of his country.

1939 The first edition of the New Zealand Listener was published.

First issue of NZ Listener published

1941  World War II: Operation Barbarossa – Germany captured Lviv, Ukraine.

1943  Florence Ballard, American singer (The Supremes). was born (d. 1976).

1944 Glenn Shorrock, Australian singer-songwriter (Little River Band) was born.

1944  World War II: The Battle of Cherbourg ended with the fall of the strategically valuable port to American forces.

1950 Leonard Whiting, British actor, was born.

1953 Hal Lindes, British-American musician (Dire Straits) was born.

1953  The first Chevrolet Corvette rolled off the assembly line in Flint, Michigan.

1956 - A TWA Super Constellation and a United Airlines DC-7 (Flight 718) collided above the Grand Canyon killing all 128 on board the two planes.

1959  A United States Air Force F-100 Super Sabre from Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, crashed into a nearby elementary school, killing 11 students plus six residents from the local neighborhood.

1960 Murray Cook, Australian singer (The Wiggles) was born.

1960  Congo gained independence from Belgium.

1962 Julianne Regan, British singer and musician (All About Eve), was born.

1963  Ciaculli massacre: A car bomb, intended for Mafia boss Salvatore Greco “Ciaschiteddu”, killed seven police and military officers near Palermo.

1966  Mike Tyson, American boxer, was born.

1966  Marton Csokas, New Zealand actor, was born.

1968  Credo of the People of God by Pope Paul VI.

1969  Nigeria banned Red Cross aid to Biafra.

1971  The crew of the Soviet Soyuz 11 spacecraft were killed when their air supply escaped through a faulty valve.

1971 – Ohio ratified the 26th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, lowering the voting age to 18, thereby putting the amendment into effect.

1972  The first leap second was added to the UTC time system.

1985 Thirty-nine American hostages from a hijacked TWA jetliner were freed in Beirut after being held for 17 days.

1986  The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states can outlaw homosexual acts between consenting adults.

1987 The Royal Canadian Mint introduced the $1 coin, known as the Loonie.

1990 East and West Germany merged their economies.

1991 32 miners were killed when a coal mine fire in the Donbass region of the Ukraine released toxic gas.

1992 Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher joined the House of Lords as Baroness Thatcher.

1997  The United Kingdom transferred sovereignty over Hong Kong to China.

2007 A car crashed into Glasgow International Airport in an attempted terrorist attack.

2009 Yemenia Flight 626 crashed off the coast of Moroni, Comoros killing 152 people and leaving 1 survivor.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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