Word of the day

February 10, 2013

Kvetch – to complain persistently; a chronic, habitual and/or whining complainer; a nagging complaint.


9/10

February 10, 2013

9/10 in NBR’s Biz Quiz.


Year of the snake

February 10, 2013

This is the weekend for Lunar New Year celebrations issuing in the Year of the Snake.

This 2013 year of Snake is meant for steady progress and attention to detail. Focus and discipline will be necessary for you to achieve what you set out to create. The Snake is the sixth sign of the Chinese Zodiac, which consists of 12 Animal Signs. It is the enigmatic, intuitive, introspective, refined and collected of the Animals Signs. Ancient Chinese wisdom says a Snake in the house is a good omen because it means that your family will not starve.


10/10

February 10, 2013

10/10 in the NZ Herald’s political quiz.


30 years of CER

February 10, 2013

CER, the Closer Economic Relationship between Australia and New Zealand is 30 years old and both countries are better for it.

Prime Minister John Key says Australia and New Zealand are two of the most integrated economies in the world and this weekend’s talks with Prime Minister Gillard have only strengthened that bond.

The two Prime Ministers are in Queenstown for the annual Australia-New Zealand Leaders’ meeting.

Prime Minister Key and Prime Minister Gillard acknowledged the 30th Anniversary of the Australia/New Zealand Closer Economic Relations Agreement (CER). 

CER is widely acknowledged as the vehicle which has seen successive governments on both sides of the Tasman progressively remove barriers to trade in goods, services and investment between the two countries. . .

CER in effect gives us a domestic market of 20 million extra people instead of just our own 4 million.

The population advantage isn’t so great for Australians but the open borders make travel easier and give businesses on both sides of the Tasman more opportunities. Consumers benefit from more choice and often lower prices and/or higher quality.

The relationship has had the odd strain. An example of this was the non-trade barriers Australia tried to impose on New Zealand apples.

However, the World Trade Organisation ruled in our favour – and Ms Gillard had to swallow that when she lost a bet with our Prime Minister:

Ms Gillard made a bet with New Zealand’s Prime Minister John Key on the outcome of the 2010 Rugby World Cup – a deal that would see the leader of whichever country lost eat an apple from the winning country.

Luckily for Mr Key, the All Blacks reigned supreme.

The bet was symbolic of the end of Australia’s 90-year ban on New Zealand apples, following a World Trade Organisation ruling that it must allow imports.

Ms Gillard finally honoured the bet during dinner with Mr Key, his wife Bronagh, and Ms Gillard’s partner Tim Mathieson in Queenstown, New Zealand, on Friday night.

“I’d have to say, of course, Australian apples are better,” Ms Gillard said.

She added that Mr Key had tried to serve her New Zealand apples on multiple occasions. . .

She would say that about the apples, but I don’t think all the consumers in her country would agree with her.


Sunday soapbox

February 10, 2013

Sunday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation.

You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, to muse or amuse.

Photo


February 10 in history

February 10, 2013

1306 Robert the Bruce murdered John Comyn, his leading political rival sparking revolution in the Scottish Wars of Independence.

1355 The St. Scholastica’s Day riot broke out in Oxford leaving 63 scholars and perhaps 30 locals dead in two days.

1567 An explosion destroyed the Kirk o’ Field house in Edinburgh. The second husband of Mary Queen of Scots, Lord Darnley was found strangled, in what many believe to be an assassination.

1763 The 1763 Treaty of Paris ended theFrench and Indian War and France ceded Quebec to Great Britain.

1775 Charles Lamb, English essayist, was born  (d. 1834).

1798 Louis Alexandre Berthier invaded Rome.

1814 Battle of Champaubert

1840 Queen Victoria married Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.

1846 First Anglo-Sikh War: Battle of Sobraon – British defeated Sikhs in final battle of the war.

1870 The YWCA was founded.

1893 Jimmy Durante, American actor/comedian, was born  (d. 1980).

1894  Harold Macmillan, British Prime Minister, was born  (d. 1986).

1906 HMS Dreadnought (1906) was launched.

1913 – News of the failure of Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s expedition to the South Pole was telegraphed secretly from Oamaru.

1920 – Jozef Haller de Hallenburg performed a symbolic wedding of Poland to the sea, celebrating restitution of Polish access to open sea.

1923 Texas Tech University was founded as Texas Technological College in Lubbock.

1930  Robert Wagner, American actor, was born.

1931 New Delhi became the capital of India.

1933 The New York City-based Postal Telegraph Company introduces the first singing telegram.

1934 Fleur Adcock, New Zealand poet, was born.

1937 Roberta Flack, American singer, was born.

1947 Italy ceded most of Venezia Giulia to Yugoslavia.

1950 Mark Spitz, American swimmer, was born.

1952 Lee Hsien Loong, Prime Minister of Singapore, was born.

1955  – Greg Norman, Australian golfer, was born.

1962 Captured American spy pilot Gary Powers was exchanged for captured Soviet spy Rudolf Abel.

1964 – The aircraft carrier HMAS Melbourne (R21) collided with the destroyer HMAS Voyager (D04) off the south coast of New South Wales.

1967 The provision of free milk in schools ended.

End of free school milk

1967 – The 25th Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified.

1981 – A fire at the Las Vegas Hilton hotel-casino killed eight and injured 198.

1982  Iafeta Paleaaesina, New Zealand rugby league player, was born.

1989 Ron Brown became the first African American to lead a major American political party when he was elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

1996 The IBM supercomputer Deep Blue defeated Garry Kasparov for the first time.

2008 The 2008 Namdaemun fire severely damaged Namdaemun, the first National Treasure of South Korea.

2009 – The communication satellites Iridium 33 and Kosmos-2251 collided in orbit, destroying both.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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