Rural round-up

Red meat sector ‘risks oblivion’:

New Zealand’s red meat industry risks oblivion in the coming decades unless it adopts its recently proposed $65 million development programme, says ANZ.

ANZ says the red meat industry development initiative is critical to the sector’s survival.

“The danger we face is that we are not alone in seeking to exploit the international market for red meat,” said Graham Turley, ANZ’s managing director, commercial and agri.

“If we are serious about wanting to develop vibrant, globally dominant and highly profitable agricultural industries, we will need all stakeholders in the industry to work together to bring about change. . .

New agriculture institute at Massey:

Massey University has established a new Institute of Agriculture and Environment.

It will provide knowledge to maximise the potential of the primary sector while protecting New Zealand’s precious natural resources.

Massey vice-chancellor Steve Maharey says a highly productive and environmentally sustainable agricultural system is vital to the nation’s future economic wellbeing. . .

$38m funding for greenhouse gas research - Allan Barber:

The Pastoral Greenhouse Gas Research Consortium (PGgRc) has just announced that it has secured funding for a further seven years’ research into greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. $2.3 million per annum will be contributed by industry partners to be matched by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment with the balance to come from AgResearch in its capacity as leader of the research project.

The consortium has been in existence since 2002 and to date has spent about $45 million of 50/50 joint venture funding from industry and government. Its members are Fonterra, Beef & Lamb New Zealand, DairyNZ, AgResearch, Landcorp Farming, DEEResearch, PGG Wrightson Ltd and Fertiliser Association Joint Venture. . .

World agriculture expert and doctor explains root cause of health issues:

You are what you eat”. A common saying passed down from one generation to the next. However, is it really as simple as that?

World-renowned American scientist and physician Dr Arden Andersen claims that the solution to common health complaints is more complex than simply a balanced diet. The explanation to our problems can be found in our soil.

Dr Arden Andersen is coming to New Zealand this month to share his secrets for healthy and sustainable living. He will be in Hawke’s Bay on Saturday 16 February at Havelock North Function Centre for a captivating one day course entitled ‘Real Medicine, Real Health’. . .

Sheepdog trialling alive and well:

Sheepdog trialling was once a popular fixture on Kiwi television. For 16 years we watched a man and his dog controlling a flock, hoping not to get that troublesome rogue sheep.

So what’s happened to the sport in the over 20 years since it left our screens?

Since the theme song faded away in 1992, sheepdog trialling has dropped off the radar. However, it’s not dying, and there’s a good reason why.

“Without sheepdogs there wouldn’t be a sheep and beef industry, and without sheep and beef there wouldn’t be a New Zealand economy,” says Sheepdog Trial Association president John Harvey.

The National Yarding Challenge finals were held recently in Taupo, with the hill trials in May. Rex Berkahn, 81, won the first two televised competitions in 1977 and 1978. . .

Top of the North first stop for TeenAg Competitions 2013:

Teenagers from all walks of life, from all over New Zealand, are being encouraged to enter the nationwide TeenAg Competition as it enters its third year. Nearly 300 students competed at Regional Finals throughout New Zealand in 2012 and the Competition is shaping up to be even bigger and better in 2013.

The first Regional Final takes place in Whangarei at the Barge Park Showgrounds on February 9th alongside the Northern Regional Final for the ANZ Young Farmer Contest and the AgriKidsNZ Competition. Competitors don’t need to belong to a TeenAg Club to enter the Competition and entry is free. . .

Green Meadows Beef Raises The Steaks:

Green Meadows Beef, a new family business that produces 100% grass-fed, free-range beef, is bringing a fresh approach to beef marketing and delivery so that New Zealanders can enjoy healthier, tastier and more ethically produced meat.

The Carey family founded Green Meadows Beef after realising that the best New Zealand beef is exported and never made available to the local market. The Carey family believe that Green Meadows Beef has a much better flavour, taste and colour compared to the beef presently available to New Zealanders. . .

And from Positivity:

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One Response to Rural round-up

  1. Andrei says:

    New Zealand’s red meat industry risks oblivion in the coming decades unless it adopts its recently proposed $65 million development programme, says ANZ.

    Really? Is that a fact? Oh woe is us!!!!!

    That whole article looks like it was generated by a computer stringing stock phrases together at random to create sentences and paragraphs because while the words look sensible they say exactly nothing except 65 million dollars needs to be spent, on what is unclear, or New Zealand’s meat producers are doomed and British Housewives, we are led to surmise, will soon be buying lamb chops in Tescos that come from sheep raised in Kazakhstan

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