Bureaucracy makes wheels of progress turn slowly

Quote of the day:

He says bureaucracy makes the wheels of progress turn slowly, and he’s excited to be part of something that won’t be hindered by Government officials. Lance O’Sullivan

He was explaining that he’d joined a joined the private inquiry into how to stop child abuse and domestic violence set up by Owen Glenn “because it has nothing to do with the Government”.

I hope those who keep calling for the government to do something take note. Sometimes, perhaps even often, something is best done by independent individuals and groups who are neither part of nor beholden to government.

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9 Responses to Bureaucracy makes wheels of progress turn slowly

  1. Andrei says:

    More empty jaw jaw.

    What’s with the upper middle class elite of this country that they think the problems of the world can be solved by themselves sitting around tables talking and producing fricken power pont presentations?

    If you seriously want to raise a people up out of the mire you start by living right yourself and setting a the best example you can to your neighbours and as you win their hearts, perhaps transforming them, if only a little.

    But given our cultural elite revel in squalor, raise it upon a pedastal even is it any wonder the poor become ever more degenerate.

    God save us all from patronizing do gooders

  2. TraceyS says:

    You are too quick to stomp on this idea, Andrei. You can be both “… living right yourself and setting the best example you can to your neighbours… ” as well as engaging in what you call “jaw jaw”. Neither precludes the other.

  3. Andrei says:

    LOL Tracey – come down from your ivory tower.

    You cannot legislate salvation or as they say you can lead a horse to water but you cannot make it drink.

    You could lay a carpet 6 inches thick over the entire surface of New Zealand with paper from the reports that people have written about New Zealands social problems.

    You can pass silly intrusive laws that impact the normal but do not a thing to address the issues where they lie – obvioulsly Sue Bradford’s pernicious anti smacking law is a classic example.

    There will always be an underclass, always, Nirvana will never be acheived in this life.

    What counts is how easy is it to escape from that underclass if born into it or how easy is it to be drawn into it from without

    And to some extent that will be defined by what society values and what it doesn’t

    So if the ruling elites values are in the toilet you cannot expect anything else from those below

  4. TraceyS says:

    “So if the ruling elites values are in the toilet you cannot expect anything else from those below”. Sad you think this way Andrei. That’s a debilitating attitude. I grew up being put in such a box as one of “those below” – being looked upon as lacking one quality or another due purely to circumstances rather than being seen for my potential. Maybe the so-called ‘ruling class’ didn’t expect much from me, that is probably very true, but I did expect more from myself. There’s no hope for kids like that in your scenario. It’s not easy to escape the underclass you’re born into and it never will be, but the more who manage to do it, the more enabling that will be for others. The more help kids have the better. They will need every bit of it.

  5. TraceyS says:

    “You can pass silly intrusive laws that impact the normal but do not a thing to address the issues where they lie – obviously Sue Bradford’s pernicious anti smacking law is a classic example.”

    Did you grow up having been thrashed by an angry parent because it was socially acceptable to do so at the time? If you did, I would expect you would feel as I do, that blunt instruments (such as clumsy laws) are sometimes needed in order to commence the long process of effecting necessary changes in attitudes.

  6. Andrei says:

    There’s no hope for kids like that in your scenario.

    The kids that escape from bad circumstance do so because they have a mentor or mentors who they look up to and who help them on their way. I’m all for that 100%. You know people like rugby coaches, parish priests, school teachers with the gifts, the energy and the dedication required to reach the reachable.

    These are not people sitting in air conditioned offices in a totally different part of the country “brainstorming” before going back to their comfortable suburban homes in leafy suburbs – these are people walking the walk in the communities where they (generally) and these kids live

  7. Andrei says:

    I had a very difficult and uncertain childhood Tracey.

    I was frequently beaten at home and at school

    Wasn’t a great beater of kids myself, my own were occaisionally smacked usually by their mother, enough to fall foul of the current law but this happened long before it was law.

    They are thriving now, we are proud of them, the way they are flourishing in this world of difficulties and sorrows so I guess they weren’t harmed too badly.

    And despite this law kids are still being maimed and killed by their whanau just as before its pasage.

  8. TraceyS says:

    Mentors, yes. But most importantly because they believe in themselves. I’ve seen kids over the last four years who are absolutely full to the top with self-belief because someone, at some time in their lives, has loved them (and incidentally they’re not ones living in ivory towers like me). But they won’t be this way for long. Once they realise that the world looks down on them.

    I’ve had these kids at home for sleepovers and they look around and say “wow, you’re so lucky” and it makes me feel terrible. There’s nothing you can say; just give them some good food, some love, respect, share what you have for as long as you can, treat them as the intelligent beings they are, and then send them home again. But most importantly don’t look down on them.

    That’s something that we could change in NZ, this pessimistic and dismissive attitude that rules kids out of a future. I just think this initiative might do something to help provide that. So when you knocked it, well, it hit a raw nerve.

  9. TraceyS says:

    Yes, but we have no way of knowing how many white parents who got dangerously close in the past (and who would be less likely to come before the courts), now think twice before dishing out a round of demeaning physical punishment.

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