Rural round-up

How to make $58,788 per year with 20 cows - Milking on the Moove:

Here’s how, with just 20 cows and a few hours a day you can make $58,788 per year.

I’m serious!

My concern is that it is getting more and more difficult for young farmers to get into farming and secondly dairy farming in particular is not an attractive career choice for the youth of today.
This blog is really about alternative ways to go dairy farming. 

The average dairy farmer has millions of dollars in assets made up of land, cows and Fonterra shares. The conventional way to progress is to work on dairy farms and progress up the share farming ladder.

But there are other ways. . .

How much do dairy farmers make part 2 – Milking on the Moove:

How much money do dairy farmers really make?

Are they really that rich?

Do they really pay no tax?

One of my first posts was “how much money do dairy farmers make”. It’s one of my most popular posts too. The major source for this post is the google search, “how much money do dairy farmers make?”.

I thought I’d go into a little more depth.

But first, what constitutes a dairy farmer? . .

2013 may be year for sheepmeat strategy – Allan Barber:

The key question for the meat industry this year is whether anybody will make any money. After last season when farmers enjoyed unprecedented procurement prices and the meat companies lost millions of dollars as a result, prices have headed south and look set to remain there for the foreseeable future.

Sheepmeat is the product most under threat with the traditional markets all showing serious signs of indigestion. As an example a US importer has been reported as saying he has a year’s worth of inventory and can’t buy any more and neither is anyone else. This signals a major problem for middle cuts like lamb racks, while Europe isn’t exactly rushing to buy any product either. . . .

DCD Suspension Supported:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) supports today’s announcement by Ravensdown and Ballance Agri-Nutrients that they have voluntarily suspended sales and use of Dicyandiamide (DCD) treatment on farm land until further notice.

“Once we knew that even very low levels of DCD residues found in milk may present a trade issue, MPI set up a working group to assess the impact of that, even though there is no food safety concern associated with the use of DCD,” Carol Barnao, MPI Deputy Director General Standards says.

Consumers’ have high expectations of New Zealand food and the regulations we have in place to ensure its quality and safety, Ms Barnao says. . .

DairyNZ supports DCD suspension:

Industry body DairyNZ has come out in support of Ravensdown and Ballance Agri-Nutrients’ voluntary suspension of sales and use of Dicyandiamide (DCD) treatment on farm land until further notice

However, DairyNZ Chief Executive Tim Mackle is urging the two companies, government authorities and dairy companies to work on pragmatic solutions that would enable the product to be back on the market and able to be used by farmers. . .

 Withdraw of DCD based nitrification inhibitors:

After traces of DCD (Dicyandiamide) were detected in liquid milk, Federated Farmers fully endorses the decision to voluntarily withdraw DCD based nitrification inhibitors until acceptable residue levels have been internationally agreed.

“DCDs are considered safe and there is no evidence to suggest otherwise, however, there is no internationally agreed acceptable level and so the default is the level of detection,” says Dr William Rolleston, Federated Farmers spokesperson on food safety.

“These residues have only come to light given the increased sophistication of testing we now possess. It really shows the thoroughness of testing within New Zealand’s primary industries and the high standard we put on ourselves to protect our reputation as a trusted supplier of food products.

“We also need to keep things in perspective because DCD based nitrification inhibitors have been applied on around 500 dairy farms out of some 12,000 in New Zealand. . .

GIMBLETT GRAVELS Syrah reaffirms pedigree to international wine critics:

Sixteen of the world’s most influential wine critics experienced GIMBLETT GRAVELS wines and hospitality yesterday as part of their tour of New Zealand’s wine regions.

For many, the prime purpose of the visit to Hawke’s Bay was to learn more about the rising phenomena of GIMBLETT GRAVELS Syrah. Twelve 2009 and 2010 vintage Syrahs, including four benchmark international wines from France and Australia, were presented ‘blind’ (completely unidentified) for their evaluation. . .

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