Rural round-up

January 23, 2013

Urgent inquiry after horse meat found in burgers – Cassandra Mason:

Food watchdogs in Britain have launched an urgent inquiry into beef produce after a number of products were found to contain horse meat.

Frozen burgers from processing plants in the UK and Ireland and on shelves at major retail chains like Tesco, were found to contain horse DNA, with some patties containing up to 29 per cent horse meat.

An investigation by British and Irish governments, food authorities and the companies involved is now underway. . . .

Awards the “tip of the iceberg”:

The Ballance Farm Environment Awards have gone from strength to strength as a showcase for sustainable farming and are more important than ever before.

“This is recognised by farmers and more of them are entering the awards each year which is continually raising the bar for other farmers,” says Ballance Chief Executive Larry Bilodeau.

“What’s important about the awards is that they do more than just acknowledge success. They are creating a growing pool of farmers who demonstrate great environmental leadership who are happy to share their advice and experience.” . . .

Federated Farmers welcomes cabinet reshuffle:

The announcement that the Hon. David Carter has been promoted to Speaker of the House and that Hon. Nathan Guy will take over as the Minister for Primary Industries is welcomed by Federated Farmers.

“This is not surprising news; we have known for some time that David Carter was likely to be promoted to Speaker,” Federated Farmers National President Bruce Wills says.

“David has built up a great working relationship with Federated Farmers and the rest of the agricultural sector in his time, as first the Minister of Agriculture and Forestry and, post ministry amalgamation, as Primary Industries Minister. We have a great deal of respect for what he has achieved for our industry over the past four years. . .

DairyNZ welcomes new Ministerial appointments:

Industry-good body DairyNZ has welcomed the appointment of Levin dairy farmer Nathan Guy to the position of Minister for Primary Industries.

DairyNZ Chairman John Luxton says the dairy industry is leading a renewed focus on responsible and competitive dairy farming, with a new Sustainable Dairying; Water Accord about to be released and a Strategy for Sustainable Dairy Farming under development and going to be launched in May.

“We know the Minister has first-hand knowledge of dairy farming and its challenges – and will be able to engage easily with farmers and talk their language,” he says. “That’s a huge plus when you are doing that job.” . .

Meanwhile down on the farm – Quilting Orchardist:

Meanwhile down on the farm….orchard actually things have been busy……yesterday and today and possibly still tomorrow we are picking avocados ( 2nd pick for the season )( there may yet be a 3rd pick in April! !!) 3 hydraladas; 2 ground pickers ( R and me ) one tractor driver R.  We have Lisa and Gavin back as our lada drivers. ( we asked for them as they do an excellent job ) . .

Freedman Eyeing Up Second $1,000,000 Karaka Million:

Last year’s $1 million New Zealand Bloodstock Karaka Million winning trainer – Australian-based Anthony Freedman – is in search of another Karaka Million title with Minaj who arrived in New Zealand last week and had her first gallop on Ellerslie’s track this morning.

Freedman has so far stuck to last year’s winning formula, having also galloped Ockham’s Razor (Any Suggestion) at Ellerslie a few days prior to the colt winning the 2012 running in emphatic fashion.
A two-year-old filly by Commands, Minaj (ex Ms Seneca Rock) has had two starts in Australia, winning her debut at Flemington by 2.5 lengths before running fourth at Mornington on 12 January. . .


Too much army

January 23, 2013

Quote of the day:

“It was probably a classic example of me probably being too much army, and not enough prince. . .Prince Harry.


Progress best prescription for people plague

January 23, 2013

Gareth Morgan has got the fur flying and alienated all cat owners with his cats to go campaign which declares the felines animalia non-grata.

David Attenborough has gone further by declaring that people are a plague on earth.

The television presenter said that humans are threatening their own existence and that of other species by using up the world’s resources.

He said the only way to save the planet from famine and species extinction is to limit human population growth.

“We are a plague on the Earth. It’s coming home to roost over the next 50 years or so. It’s not just climate change; it’s sheer space, places to grow food for this enormous horde. Either we limit our population growth or the natural world will do it for us, and the natural world is doing it for us right now,” he told the Radio Times.

I won’t go as far as Not PC who says you first David  because as Tim Worstall points out there is a far better way than death to manage population growth:

. . . we do in fact know how to manage this process of curtailing growth in the number of humans.

Get rich.

Everywhere it has happened, everywhere this species of ours has gone from rural and Malthusian destitution to a bourgeois urban middle classness, the population growth rate has fallen like a stone. Indeed, so much so that it becomes the population contraction rate. It doesn’t actually need you and Jonny Porritt demanding full body condoms for all. It only requires that people know they can eat three times a day, have a roof over their heads and that there’s a decent chance that all the children they do have will survive into adulthood. Absent immigration there just isn’t any population growth in the rich world. Far from it, there’s contraction (to be absolutely accurate you have to adjust for it taking until the second generation of immigrants to reduce childbirth down to the rate of the indigenes). . .

Yes, those of the deep, dark, anti-progress, anti-people persuasion might not like it but the best prescription for the people population plague is progress of the economic kind.

I’m not sure what affect it will have on the cat population though.


Milk in Schools show no need for taxpayers’ food for all

January 23, 2013

The Mana Party says support is increasing for its plan for taxpayer funded food for all decile one and two schools:

“It’s a pretty simple bill really” says MANA Leader and MP for Te Tai Tokerau Hone Harawira, “Invest in making sure the 80,000 kids going to school hungry each week are fed and ready to learn and realise the benefits in better educated and healthier school leavers down the track”. . . 

I don’t know where the 80,000 comes from but Fonterra’s milk in schools programme has proved that not all low decile schools have hungry children and that some higher decile schools.

Fonterra’s trial in Northland showed some schools wanted the milk and some didn’t.

The scheme is now being rolled out through the rest of the country and some schools are choosing to get it but others aren’t.

There is no point in a universal scheme for decile one and two schools which provides for some who aren’t in need and misses others who are, especially when schemes like Fonterra’s milk in sare providing help where it’s needed without taxpayers’ money.


Sunny day blues

January 23, 2013

“I’m feeling blue,” she said.

“Blue? How can you have a smile that big if you’re feeling blue?” he asked.

“There’s two sorts of feeling blue. There’s the sad, bad blue like a bruise, and the other happy blue like the sky on a sunny day,” she said.

“I’ve got the sunny day blues and they always make me smile.”


January 23 in history

January 23, 2013

971 In China, the war elephant corps of the Southern Han were soundly defeated at Shao by crossbow fire from Song Dynasty troops. The Southern Han state was forced to submit to the Song Dynasty, ending not only Southern Han rule, but also the first regular war elephant corps employed in a Chinese army that had gained the Southern Han victories throughout the 10th century.

1368  Zhu Yuanzhang ascended to the throne of China as the Hongwu Emperor, initiating Ming Dynasty rule over China that lasted for three centuries.

1510  Henry VIII, then 18 years old, appeared incognito in the lists at Richmond, and was applauded for his jousting before he reveals his identity.

1556 The deadliest earthquake in history, the Shaanxi earthquake, hit Shaanxi province, China. The death toll may have been as high as 830,000.

1570  The assassination of regent James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray threw Scotland into civil war.

1571 The Royal Exchange opened in London.

1579 The Union of Utrecht formed a Protestant republic in the Netherlands.

1656 Blaise Pascal published the first of his Lettres provinciales.

1719 The Principality of Liechtenstein was created within the Holy Roman Empire.

1789  Georgetown College, the first Roman Catholic college in the United States, was founded.

1793 Second Partition of Poland: Russia and Prussia partitioned Poland for the second time.

1813 Camilla Collett, Norwegian writer and feminist, was born  (d. 1895).

1832  Edouard Manet, French artist, was born (d. 1883).

1849  Elizabeth Blackwell the USA’s first female doctor, was awarded her M.D. by the Medical Institute of Geneva, New York.

1855 John Moses Browning, American inventor, was born (d. 1926).

1855 A magnitude 8.2 earthquake hit the Welington region.

Massive earthquake hits Wellington region

1855  The first bridge over the Mississippi River opened.

1870 U.S. cavalrymen killed 173 Native Americans, mostly women and children, in the Marias Massacre.

1897  Sir William Samuel Stephenson, Canadian soldier, W.W.II codename, Intrepid. Inspiration for James Bond., was born (d. 1989).

1897 Elva Zona Heaster was found dead.The resulting murder trial of her husband is perhaps the only case in United States history where the alleged testimony of a ghost helped secure a conviction.

1899 Emilio Aguinaldo was sworn in as President of the First Philippine Republic.

1904 Ålesund Fire: the Norwegian coastal town Ålesund was devastated by fire, leaving 10,000 people homeless and one person dead.

1907 Charles Curtis of Kansas became the first Native American U.S. Senator.

1912 The International Opium Convention was signed at The Hague.

1920  The Netherlands refused to surrender ex-Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany to the Allies.

1943 Troops of Montgomery‘s 8th Army captured Tripoli from the German-Italian Panzer Army.

1943  World War II: Australian and American forces defeated the Japanese army in Papua. This turning point in the Pacific War marked the beginning of the end of Japanese aggression.

1943 Duke Ellington played at Carnegie Hall  for the first time.

1948  Anita Pointer, American singer (Pointer Sisters), was born.

1950 – The Knesset passed a resolution that stated Jerusalem is the capital of Israel.

1951 Yachts left Wellington bound for Lyttelton in an ocean yacht race to celebrate Canterbury’s centenary.  Only one, Tawhiri, officially finished the race. Two other yachts, Husky and Argo, were lost along with their 10 crew members.

Disastrous centennial yacht race begins
1951  Chesley Sullenberger, Captain of US Airways Flight 1549, a flight that successfully ditched into the Hudson River, was born.
1957  Princess Caroline of Monaco, was born.
1958 Overthrow in Venezuela of Marcos Pérez Jiménez

1960 The bathyscaphe USS Trieste broke a depth record by descending to 10,911 m (35,798 feet) in the Pacific Ocean.

1964 The 24th Amendment to the United States Constitution, prohibiting the use of poll taxes in national elections, was ratified.

1973 President Richard Nixon announced that a peace accord has been reached in Vietnam.

1973 A volcanic eruption devastated Heimaey in the Vestmannaeyjar chain of islands off the south coast of Iceland.

1985 O.J. Simpson became the first Heisman Trophy winner elected to the Football Hall of Fame.

1986  The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducted its first members: Chuck Berry, James Brown, Ray Charles, Fats Domino, the Everly Brothers, Buddy Holly, Jerry Lee Lewis and Elvis Presley.

1997 Madeleine Albright became the first woman to serve as United States Secretary of State.

2003 Final communication between Earth and Pioneer 10

2009 Dendermonde nursery attack in Dendermonde, Belgium.

2010 – Protests took place in 60 Canadian cities against the prorogation of the 40th Canadian Parliament.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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