Word of the day

November 30, 2012

Ceilidh – an Irish or Scottish social gathering with traditional music, dancing, and storytelling.


Rural round-up

November 30, 2012

On the hoof – Sally  Rae:

The West Coast, where tradition and time appear to stand still, folk heroes are born, and the compelling scenery in all directions is as attention-grabbing as the sandflies, and where the annual Haast cattle sale is a firm fixture on the farming calendar. Agribusiness reporter Sally Rae and illustrations editor Stephen Jaquiery went along for a look.

Looking to the future, John (J. J.) Nolan believes eventually there might not be a cattle sale at the Turnbull saleyards at Haast.

With the advent of modern technology, he reckons 1000 head of cattle could potentially be sold one day in a video sale, in the pub, over a cold beer. But he hopes that he never sees that happen.

For the Nolan family – household names in Westland since first arriving at Jackson Bay in 1885 – have been taking their cattle to sales for generations. . .

Stud proves a winner – Sally Rae:

Stud breeding is in Wayne Williams’ blood.

Mr Williams and his wife Maggie own Glacier Horned Herefords at Fox Glacier, continuing a tradition that started back in the 1940s when his grandfather established a Hereford stud, then named Bluedale stud.

Slideshow: Haast cattle sale

After he moved to Canterbury and took some of the cattle with him, Mr Williams’ father took over the farm and the stud name was changed to Glacier Horned Herefords.

Sustainability efforts awarded:

Taranaki laundry and dry cleaning operation La Nuova Apparelmaster and Wairarapa farming business Aohanga are among those honoured in the 2012 Sustainable 60 awards, announced in Auckland this evening.

The Sustainable 60 awards recognise firms which incorporate sustainable practices into the operation and management of their businesses. . .

Sheep, beef and forestry agribusiness Aohanga takes out the award for Strategy and Governance.

It is a Maori incorporation with a firm focus on the future. The hapu has continuously held its land in the Northern Wairarapa since pre-European times, and has written a 100-year business plan taking it to 2100. . .

Rabobank 2013 Commodities Outlook: Agri markets to remain volatile as fundamentals ‘rebalance on a tightrope':

Volatility in agri commodity prices looks set to continue into 2013, according to a report from Rabobank’s Agri Commodity Markets Research department. This will be particularly true for grain and oilseeds markets, with a supply squeeze in the first six months expected to push prices higher, before an expected production rebound leads to a weakening in prices in the second half of the year. The report says soymeal is the commodity likely to show the largest price decline by the end of 2013. In contrast, Rabobank analysts expect palm oil to be the strongest performer, as Chinese imports and biofuel demand drive prices higher after the sell-off in 2012. The soft commodity markets should continue in the same vein as this year, with prices expected to be relatively range bound.. . . 

BEEFLAMBNZ.COM Wins Prestigious Website Award:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand scooped the hotly contested prize for best private sector website at this year’s WriteMark New Zealand Plain English Awards.

The annual awards honour the organisations and people who are trying to make the world a better place by banishing jargon and gobbledygook.

The judges said: “This is certainly the best entry in the category. Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s farmer website shows a strong commitment to plain English. The purpose is really clear and the pages show plain language, active verbs, and short sentences. Useful summaries and clear navigation help site visitors quickly find what they need.” . .

Fonterra Australia-NZ boss leaves after regional rejig – Paul McBeth

Fonterra Cooperative Group’s Australia New Zealand managing director John Doumani will leave the dairy exporter after the company rejigged its regional boundaries.

The cooperative, fresh from raising $525 million through its shareholders’ fund to reduce shareholder redemption risk, has reorganised its consumer businesses to combine Australia and New Zealand with the ASEAN/Middle East/North Africa unit, it said in a statement. Sydney-based Doumani signalled he will leave the dairy exporter in March next year due to the restructuring, it said. . .

Dairying women prepare to challenge their boundaries at annual conference:

Hundreds of women who work in the dairy industry will be tackling some of the big issues that affect today’s farmers including the rural/urban divide, environmental constraints and developing future leaders, when they get together at the Dairy Women Network’s annual conference in March 2013.

The line-up of high calibre keynote speakers includes Olympic rowing gold medal winner Mahe Drysdale.

The two-day conference at Nelson’s Rutherford Hotel, starting on 20 March 2013, is themed ‘Taking down the boundary fences’. . .

Chairman of Central Plains Water steps down

Pat Morrison, chairman of Central Plains Water Ltd since 2003, has retired from the position but will remain on the board as a director.

An integral part the project since its inception in 2000, he believes the time is now right to hand over the reins.

“Having been involved right through the resource consenting phase, and with the scheme now moving into the design and construction stage, it is an appropriate time to hand over the role to CPWL Director and newly appointed Acting Chairman, Doug Catherwood who has been deputy chairman. . .

Three Months, Three Trophies, One Wine:

Coopers Creek’s Select Vineyards Albariño 2012 has won its third Trophy in three months.

It’s been dubbed “The Wine of the Summer”.

Back in late August at the New Zealand wine industry’s Bragato Conference, Coopers Creek Select Vineyards Gisborne Albariño 2012 was awarded its first Trophy. This was a surprising and impressive result for a young wine, new to this country and only in its second vintage. Just over a month later, in early October, the “Bell-Ringer” as it’s affectionately known, secured its second Trophy at the International Aromatic Wine Competition. Then last weekend at the celebration dinner for the country’s most prestigious competition, the Air New Zealand Wine Awards, the news of a third Trophy for the Albariño! . .


Friday’s answers

November 30, 2012

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: We look to Scotland for all our ideas of civilisation.?

2. What is the common name for Calluna vulgaris?

3. It’s l’avoine in French, avena in Italian and Spanish and ōti in Maori, what is it in English?

4.What’s a tatty bogler?

5. Alfred Hitchcok said – “I understand the inventor of the bagpipes was inspired when he saw a man carrying an indignant, asthmatic pig under his arm. Unfortunately, the man-made object never equalled the purity of the sound achieved by the pig.” Was he right?

Points for answers:

Alwyn got five (at third attempt) and a smile for the word play for #4 which wins an electronic batch of shortbread. It wasn’t the wine I was after for the answer but drinking some recently prompted the question.

Grant got three – with a bonus for admitting you were swayed by Alwyn and another for logic re enlightenment.

Andrei got three and a bonus for the music. If the internet can be trusted it was a real quote – I found it in three places.

 

 

 

Answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Pre-opening quotes for Fonterra $6.50

November 30, 2012

A share broker tells us that pre-opening quotes for Fonterra units are at $6.50.

The launch takes place at midday and demand is far outstripping supply.

There are 100,000 shares for sale at $6.50 and offers to buy 4 million.


Scottish is

November 30, 2012

For St Andrew’s Day:


Cow bell opens trading

November 30, 2012

A cow bell will ring to open trading on the New Zealand share market this morning to recognise the launch of Fonterra units.

They’ve been issued at $5.50.

Question of the day: what will they sell for now?

The other question is how many have bought to trade and how many are there for the long haul?


Political interest trumps natural justice

November 30, 2012

The first editor for whom I worked warned me that while family feuds might be of interest to the prurient they were rarely of sufficient merit to warrant publication.

He would have been at best bemused and more likely appalled that accusations over Brendan Horan and his late mother’s money were splashed over the front page of a national paper, even if he is an MP.

His party leader, Winston Peters, has sent him home to sort it out.

Why only when when Peters has know about the accusation for months?

Yes, Horan has been caught up in a family feud over his mother’s will.

That could be viewed as a personal issue – whereby Horan should be left to sort it out on his personal time and keep doing his job.

But by standing Horan down, Peters has elevated the issue to a public one.

Remember Peters was told about this two months ago – and has done absolutely nothing about it.

He says he’s got no evidence from Horan’s siblings proving the allegations about missing money from the mother – but neither has he got any evidence from Horan disproving it.

But Peters only acted to stand Horan down when the story broke on Sunday.

That’s because he doesn’t like the publicity – given Winston Peters’ elderly constituency, he certainly does not want to be seen to be propping up an MP who has been dipping into his elderly mother’s money.

Political interest trumps natural justice now the story is public.The idea that people are supposed to be innocent until proven guilty doesn’t seem to matter.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,408 other followers

%d bloggers like this: