Rural round-up

Some bills 80 times initial quotes -

South Canterbury farmers are challenging Environment Canterbury over more than $300,000 worth of administration costs they have been charged for water consents. 

    Some of the bills are 80 times greater than the amount the farmers were initially quoted. 

    The group of 17 South Canterbury and North Otago consent holders will dispute the administration costs at a hearing in Lincoln on Monday. 

    The costs were billed to the farmers back in 2010 after they were granted 35-year consents to take water from the Hakataramea River. The farmers had waited more than a decade for the consent decision. . .

Legal scrap on cards over LIC hairy calves - Richard Rennie:

Farmers stuck with mutant LIC genetics have strong legal grounds for mounting a compensation challenge against the breeding company, a senior lawyer says.

Concern is growing through all dairying regions as more farmers discover young stock containing the genetics from the LIC bull Matrix.

The bull has sired calves exhibiting mutated traits including excessive hairiness, poor growth rates and ill thrift. .

Tax changes leave way open for farm succession:

Controversial changes to tax legislation around livestock valuation will no longer disadvantage new generation farmers following a successful submission process by accounting firm BDO.

Amendments to the proposed ‘Herd Scheme’ changes were released yesterday [Thursday 13 Sept], providing exemptions for farm succession that free up new generation farmers from restrictive tax barriers.

“The exemption for farm succession has come a long way from the original proposal,”’ says BDO Tax Specialist and Farm Accountant Charles Rau. . .

Best coal under best farmland – Tim Fulton:

Some Australians see Drew Hutton as a pinprick for environmental consciousness; others think he’s a pain in the backside. But the spiritual leader of the Australian Green Party has people listening when it comes to coal mining and drilling for gas.

“We’ve got some areas in Australia where we’ve got 100% support. You can’t get those figures outside of a dictatorship usually.”

Hutton is the elected champion of the “Lock the Gate Alliance”, a network of 120 community groups galvanized against perceived bullying from the mining industry.

And it doesn’t take much of a lecture from Hutton to learn landowner rights and public health is top of their agenda, as is the very future of farming on premium Aussie soil. . . .

Training for beekeepers debated – Peter Watson:

An upsurge of interest in beekeeping has sparked debate about how well trained new entrants are. 

    The number of beekeepers has grown by more than 500 to 3775 and hives by 35,000 to 429,000 over the last year, many of them hobbyists wanting to do their bit to help boost bee numbers in the face of growing threats to their health. . .

Buffalo and rhino make big money:

MAKING SURE none of the rhinoceros herd is poached during the night isn’t something New Zealand farmers have to worry about but it is typical for an increasing number of South African farmers diversifying into the lucrative game breeding industry.  

After several years of rapid growth, there are now estimated to be more than 10,000 commercial game ranches in South Africa breeding rare species for hunting, meat and conservation purposes. . . .

The June issue of Country Wide is now on-line.

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