Word of the day

June 30, 2012

Larrup – a blow; to beat  flog, thrash or whip.


4/10

June 30, 2012

Obviously not paying attention this week – only 4/10 in Stuff’s Biz Quiz.


Saturday’s smiles

June 30, 2012

The school inspector is assigned to the year 4 class in one of the local Brisbane state schools. He is introduced to the class by the teacher. She says to the class, “Let’s show the inspector just how clever you are by allowing him to ask you a question”.

The inspector reasons that normally class starts with religious instruction, so he will ask a Biblical question.
He asks :”Class, who broke down the walls of Jericho?”

For a full minute there is absolute silence. The children all just stare at him blankly. Eventually, little Bruce raises his hand. The inspector excitedly points to him.

Bruce stands up and replies: “Sir, I don’t know who broke down the walls of Jericho, but I can assure you it wasn’t me”.

The inspector is shocked by the answer and looks at the teacher for an explanation. Realizing that he is perturbed, the teacher says: “Well, I’ve known Bruce since the beginning of the year, and I believe that if he says that he didn’t do it, then he didn’t do it”.

The inspector is even more shocked at this and storms down to the principal’s office and tells him what happened, to which the principal replies : “I don’t know the boy, but I socialize every now and then with his teacher, and I believe her. If she thinks that the boy is innocent, then he must be innocent”. 

The inspector can’t believe what he is hearing. He grabs the phone on the principal’s desk and in a rage dials Julia Gillard’s telephone number and rattles all the conversations to her and asks her what she thinks of the education standard in the State.. 

The PM sighs heavily and replies: “I don’t know the boy, the teacher or the principal, but just get three quotes and have the wall fixed.”

Apropos of this a friend who teaches speech has found she has to rule out lots of old poems because the children no longer know enough about Christianity to understand a lot of the imagery.

The loss of knowledge about religion has cultural implications too.


Lost in translation?

June 30, 2012

We spotted this sign near a railway station in Holland.

Does Kiss & Ride mean to the Dutch what it means in English  or has something been lost in translation?


Hicks Feds’ Agribusiness person of Year

June 30, 2012

Progressive Meats Managing Director, Craig Hickson, is the 2012 Allflex/Federated Farmers Agribusiness Person of the Year.

Dr Doug Edmeades  has won the Ravensdown/Federated Farmers Agri Personality award for 2012.

“We are pleased to have such high calibre award winners,” says Bruce Wills, Federated Farmers President. . .

“Craig runs a mixed 1200 hectare sheep, deer and beef farm in Hawke’s Bay and in addition to Progressive Meats, is a member of the Meat Board. Craig is also a Director of Ovation New Zealand and a number of other meat companies. Somehow he finds the time to sit on the Boards of both Beef+Lamb New Zealand Ltd and Ovita Limited.

“Our other major award is the Ravensdown/Federated Farmers Agri Personality for 2012. This is determined by the main board of Federated Farmers itself and we had a wealth of people to choose from who had really stood up over the past year.

“Ironically it was one of the finalists from the Agribusiness person of the year for 2011 who took the title.

“That being the passionate and highly charismatic Dr Doug Edmeades of AgKnowledge. Doug has worked closely with Federated Farmers as an expert witness and has emerged as a scientific advocate for sensible farming practices.

“Doug is a scientist who argues in the media for solutions and not problems making him a very popular choice,” Mr Wills concluded.

Congratulations to both winners and to Federated Farmers for showcasing agribusiness talent.


Show we care with results not money

June 30, 2012

Quote of the day:

. . . On this side of the House we do not think it is adequate to simply spend billions and tell the country that we care. We want to get real results for the community, for individuals, and for the economy. Frankly, I am not surprised by the Opposition’s reaction, because focusing on getting better results is a relatively new experience for the New Zealand Government, as the last lot was focused on how they managed to spend the most money. Steven Joyce.


June 30 in history

June 30, 2012

350 Roman usurper Nepotianus, of the Constantinian dynasty, was defeated and killed by troops of the usurper Magnentius.

1422  Battle of Arbedo between the duke of Milan and the Swiss cantons.

1520  The Spaniards were expelled from Tenochtitlan.

1559  King Henry II of France was seriously injured in a jousting match against Gabriel de Montgomery.

1651 The Deluge: Khmelnytsky Uprising – the Battle of Beresteczko ended with a Polish victory.

1688  The Immortal Seven issued the Invitation to William, continuing the struggle for English independence from Rome.

1758  Seven Years’ War: The Battle of Domstadtl.

1794 Native American forces under Blue Jacket attacked Fort Recovery.

1859  French acrobat Charles Blondin crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope.

1860  The 1860 Oxford evolution debate at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.

1864 U.S. President Abraham Lincoln granted Yosemite Valley to California for “public use, resort and recreation”.

1882  Charles J. Guiteau was hanged for the assassination of President James Garfield.

1886 The first transcontinental train trip across Canada departs from Montreal.

1905 Albert Einstein published the article “On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies”, in which he introduced special relativity.

1906  The United States Congress passed the Meat Inspection Act and Pure Food and Drug Act.
1908 Winston Graham, British writer, was born (d. 2003).

1908  The Tunguska explosion in SIberia – commonly believed to have been caused by the air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an altitude of 5–10 kilometres (3.1–6.2 mi) above the Earth’s surface.

1912  The Regina Cyclone hit Regina, Saskatchewan, killing 28.

1917  Susan Hayward, American actress, was born (d. 1975).

1917 – Lena Horne, American singer and actress (d. 2010)

1934  The Night of the Long Knives, Adolf Hitler’s violent purge of his political rivals took place.

1935  The Senegalese Socialist Party held its first congress.

1936  Emperor Haile Selassie of Abbysinia appealled for aid to the League of Nations against Mussolini’s invasion of his country.

1939 The first edition of the New Zealand Listener was published.

First issue of NZ Listener published

1941  World War II: Operation Barbarossa – Germany captured Lviv, Ukraine.

1943  Florence Ballard, American singer (The Supremes). was born (d. 1976).

1944 Glenn Shorrock, Australian singer-songwriter (Little River Band) was born.

1944  World War II: The Battle of Cherbourg ended with the fall of the strategically valuable port to American forces.

1950 Leonard Whiting, British actor, was born.

1953 Hal Lindes, British-American musician (Dire Straits) was born.

1953  The first Chevrolet Corvette rolled off the assembly line in Flint, Michigan.

1956 - A TWA Super Constellation and a United Airlines DC-7 (Flight 718) collided above the Grand Canyon killing all 128 on board the two planes.

1959  A United States Air Force F-100 Super Sabre from Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, crashed into a nearby elementary school, killing 11 students plus six residents from the local neighborhood.

1960 Murray Cook, Australian singer (The Wiggles) was born.

1960  Congo gained independence from Belgium.

1962 Julianne Regan, British singer and musician (All About Eve), was born.

1963  Ciaculli massacre: A car bomb, intended for Mafia boss Salvatore Greco “Ciaschiteddu”, killed seven police and military officers near Palermo.

1966  Mike Tyson, American boxer, was born.

1966  Marton Csokas, New Zealand actor, was born.

1968  Credo of the People of God by Pope Paul VI.

1969  Nigeria banned Red Cross aid to Biafra.

1971  The crew of the Soviet Soyuz 11 spacecraft were killed when their air supply escaped through a faulty valve.

1971 – Ohio ratified the 26th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, lowering the voting age to 18, thereby putting the amendment into effect.

1972  The first leap second was added to the UTC time system.

1985 Thirty-nine American hostages from a hijacked TWA jetliner were freed in Beirut after being held for 17 days.

1986  The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states can outlaw homosexual acts between consenting adults.

1987 The Royal Canadian Mint introduced the $1 coin, known as the Loonie.

1990 East and West Germany merged their economies.

1991 32 miners were killed when a coal mine fire in the Donbass region of the Ukraine released toxic gas.

1992 Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher joined the House of Lords as Baroness Thatcher.

1997  The United Kingdom transferred sovereignty over Hong Kong to China.

2007 A car crashed into Glasgow International Airport in an attempted terrorist attack.

2009 Yemenia Flight 626 crashed off the coast of Moroni, Comoros killing 152 people and leaving 1 survivor.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


Word of the day

June 29, 2012

Oleaginous – rich in, covered with, or producing oil; oily or greasy; exaggeratedly and distastefully complimentary; falsely or smugly earnest; obsequious;   unctuous.


Friday’s answers

June 29, 2012

Thursday’s questions are here.

Paul gets the electronic lolly cake for leaving everyone else without an answer for at least two of his three questions you can decide if Richard’s response is correct – and a sigh because I’d been deliberately avoiding any mention of the court case until it’s over.

UPDATE: My knowledge of media law is very rusty but the more I think about it the less comfortable I am with  discussion on a case before the court so I’ve deleted the second question and Richard’s answer.


Should unemployed be drug tested?

June 29, 2012

Employers can require employees to undergo drug tests, should unemployed people be required to undergo drug tests too?

Should the unemployed all be drug tested before being allowed to receive a benefit?

That offhand question from Finance Minister Bill English drew a round of applause from Federated Farmers delegates at the group’s AGM in Auckland on Thursday.

Having been asked why New Zealand was bringing in migrants for agricultural work while there were unemployed Kiwi youth on benefits, English responded by saying from his experience, many of the unemployed youth in his Clutha/Southland electorate could get jobs at the freezing works or in forestry if only they could pass a drugs test. “Which makes you wonder whether we should have a drugs test for putting people on [the] benefit,” he said.

Unemployed people on benefits are supposed to do all they can to be work-ready and find work.

Being drug-free would be a requirement for most if not all jobs therefore those on drugs wouldn’t be doing all they could to be work-ready.


Pure brand damaged from within

June 29, 2012

Trade Minister Tim Groser says New Zealand’s 100% pure brand is being damaged from within:

“Our enemies who are internal, will find one cow in one stream and feed it back to environmental activists in the developed world to be used to try to exclude New Zealand’s products and services in the ludicrous belief this will somehow help New Zealand.”

The 100% pure brand was used to market the New Zealand tourism experience and it has been deliberately manipulated in this space,” Mr Groser says.

There’s nothing like being overseas to help you realise just how relatively clean and green New Zealand is.

That is easier for us when we are relatively under-populated and it doesn’t mean there isn’t room for improvement.

But internal saboteurs who use isolated examples of what are usually insignificant problems to paint a dirty picture do the country a disservice.

They do nothing to improve the environment and pose a very real danger to the economy on which we depend if we are to afford the even cleaner, greener environment to which most of us aspire.


New priorities for ACC

June 29, 2012

In the clouds hanging over ACC it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that the corporation was in a dire financial situation just a few years ago.

Thanks to hard work by the board and management that is no longer the case but there is no doubt there are other problems facing the corporation, particularly in its dealing with claimants.

ACC Minister Judith Collins aims to solve  those problems with new priorities:

“New Zealanders rightfully expect to be able to trust in ACC and its integrity and for ACC to ensure entitlements are delivered transparently and fairly to those who need them.

“Our new priorities set out key initiatives, measures and targets to ensure ACC meets the highest standards of best practice and service for its clients, and achieves outcomes that are consistent with the spirit of ACC’s pioneering objectives.

“A critical priority for ACC is to promote and rebuild the trust and confidence of Kiwis in the scheme it manages on their behalf. Privacy and information security is also a priority and I expect ACC to improve its practices and culture in this area.

“For claimants with a genuine need and a right to support, ACC must follow a fair process for assessing their eligibility and ensuring they receive fair entitlements.

“I expect ACC to be sensitive, responsive, and provide an excellent and timely service that reflects best practice and to minimise the number of disputes proceeding to review and litigation.

“ACC must achieve outcomes that are consistent with the letter and spirit of the legislation, while still preserving public trust and confidence,” says Ms Collins.

Among the Government’s new priorities for ACC are for the Corporation to:

  • improve public trust and confidence
  • improve management and security of private information
  • maintain a focus on levy stability and financial sustainability
  • provide high quality services for clients, and
  • ensure early resolution of disputes.

The theory of a no-fault ACC system is the envy of many other countries.

The new priorities ought to ensure the corporation’s practices restore the trust that has been lost and that it does the job it is supposed to do, fairly and in a timely manner.


June 29 in history

June 29, 2012

1149 Raymond of Antioch was defeated and killed at the Battle of Inab by Nur ad-Din Zangi.

1194  Sverre was crowned King of Norway.

1444 Skanderbeg defeated an Ottoman invasion force at Torvioll.

1534  Jacques Cartier made the European discovery of Prince Edward Island.

1613 The Globe Theatre in London  burned to the ground.

1644 Charles I defeated a Parliamentarian detachment at the Battle of Cropredy Bridge, the last battle won by an English King on English soil.

1659  Battle of Konotop: Ukrainian armies of Ivan Vyhovsky defeatedthe Russians, led by Prince Trubetskoy.

1749  New Governor Charles de la Ralière Des Herbiers arrives at Isle Royale (Cape Breton Island).

1786  Alexander Macdonell and more than five hundred Roman Catholic highlanders left Scotland to settle in Glengarry County, Ontario.

1850  Coal was discovered on Vancouver Island.

1850   Autocephaly officially granted by the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople to the Church of Greece.

1861 William James Mayo, American physician, was born (d. 1939).

1864  Ninety-nine people were killed in Canada’s worst railway disaster near St-Hilaire, Quebec.

1874  Greek politician Charilaos Trikoupis published a manifesto in the Athens daily Kairoi entitled “Who’s to Blame?” in which he laid out his complaints against King George.

1880  France annexed Tahiti.

1891  Street railway in Ottawa commenced operation.

1895  Doukhobors burned their weapons as a protest against conscription by the Tsarist Russian government.

1900 Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, French writer, was born (d. 1944).

1901 Nelson Eddy, American singer and actor, was born (d. 1967).

1914  Jina Guseva attempted to assassinate Grigori Rasputin.

1916  Sir Roger Casement, Irish Nationalist and British diplomat was sentenced to death for his part in the Easter Rising.

1922  France granted 1 km² at Vimy Ridge “freely, and for all time, to the Government of Canada, the free use of the land exempt from all taxes.”

1925 Canada House opened in London.

1926  Arthur Meighen returned to office as Prime Minister of Canada.

1927  First test of Wallace Turnbull’s Controllable pitch propeller.

1928 The Outerbridge Crossing and Goethals Bridge in Staten Island, New York opened.

1937  Joseph-Armand Bombardier of Canada received a patent for sprocket and track traction system used in snow vehicles.

1943 Little Eva, American singer, was born  (d. 2003).

1945  Carpathian Ruthenia was annexed by Soviet Union.

1972  The U.S. Supreme Court ruled the death penalty could constitute “cruel and unusual punishment”.

1974 Isabel Perón was sworn in as the first female President of Argentina.

1976 Bret McKenzie, New Zealand musician, (Flight of the Conchords) was born.

1976  The Seychelles became independent from the United Kingdom.

1990 Dr Penny Jamieson became the first woman in the world to be appointed an Anglican bishop.

World's first female Anglican bishop appointed

1995  Space Shuttle program: STS-71 Mission Atlantis docks with the Russian space station Mir for the first time.

1995  The Sampoong Department Store collapsed in Seoul, killing 501 and injuring 937.

2002  Naval clashes between South Korea and North Korea led to the death of six South Korean sailors and sinking of a North Korean vessel.

2006  Hamdan v. Rumsfeld: The U.S. Supreme Court rules that President George W. Bush’s plan to try Guantanamo Bay detainees in military tribunals violated U.S. and international law.

2007  Two car bombs were found in the heart of London at Picadilly Circus.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


Word of the day

June 28, 2012

Commination - a  formal denunciation; threatening divine vengeance; the recital of divine threats against sinners in the Anglican Liturgy for Ash Wednesday.


Why change what works?

June 28, 2012

A survey found that 40% of people only ever use one cycle on their machine, no matter what’s being washed.

I’m surprised that number isn’t higher.

There’s little change to what gets put in our dishwasher and therefore very rarely a need to change its cycle when it works.

But ours is just used to wash dishes unlike some others:

Gen Ys are more likely than all other age groups to not understand dishwasher cycle options and are also less likely to be able to perform basic maintenance on their machines.

“They are also more likely to use their dishwasher to clean things other than dishes and cutlery; washing pans, baking trays, sponges and even toothbrushes or sports shoes,” says Bonnar.

Toothbrushes and sports shoes?

That raises a whole lot of questions but I’m not sure I want to know the answers.


Thursday’s quiz

June 28, 2012

This is your opportunity to ask the questions.

An electronic batch of lolly cake will go to anyone who stumps everyone.


Writing on books

June 28, 2012

Do/can you write on the pages of books you’re reading?

I don’t mean other people’s books, that is graffiti if not desecration.

I mean your own books.

The thought occurred to me while reading Quiet, the Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain.*

There are so many good lines, paragraphs, sometimes whole pages I want to remember that I’m itching to underline them or make notes in the margins.

But I can’t do it.

Blame it on my upbringing by parents who instilled in me a love of reading and such respect for books that I can’t deliberately mark a page.

* Published by  Viking 2012.


Planet EU like Planet Labour

June 28, 2012

The theory behind the European Union might be good, but in practice it is full of problems, not least of which is the rules and regulations which hinder businesses unnecessarily.

There is no better example than a ruling from the EU’s Court of Justice that workers who happened to get sick on holiday were legally entitled to take another holiday:

The workers originally won their case in a Spanish court, where they argued that collective bargaining agreements made a distinction between annual leave and sick leave that was recognized by Spanish law. The National Association of Large Distribution Businesses, known as Anged, appealed to the Supreme Court in Madrid, which then asked the Court of Justice for a ruling on how to apply European law covering working times.

The Court of Justice had previously ruled that a person who gets sick before going on vacation is entitled to reschedule the vacation, and on Thursday it said that right extended into the vacation itself.

“The point at which the temporary incapacity arose is irrelevant,” the court found.

The ruling applies across the European Union of 27 countries.

It isn’t unknown for people to suffer self-inflicted illnesses while on holiday from too much sun, food and/or alcohol.

If I read this ruling correctly it would allow people who have hangovers to add an extra day to their holidays . There would be nothing to stop them repeating the acts which led to the hangover which would result in another day’s illness and a subsequent extra day’s holiday and keep on doing that.

This ruling effectively enables people to take permanent holidays.

It shows that Planet EU is similar to Planet Labour – a place far removed from the real world where there’s no understanding of the connection between productivity and progress.

Hat tip: Anti Dismal


Trial periods work for businesses and workers

June 28, 2012

Employers are using the 90 day trial  period to reduce the risk of taking on new staff and they are employing more people because of it.

This is one of the findings from research undertaken by the Department of Labour:

The Employers’ Perspectives – Part One: Trial Periods research is based on the findings of the National Survey of Employers of around 2,000 employers and qualitative interviews with 53 employers in Hawke’s Bay, Wellington, Auckland and Dunedin/Invercargill from the retail, hospitality, agriculture, forestry and fishing, and manufacturing industries.

The report found:
 

• Sixty percent of hiring employers in the national survey reported using a trial period since its introduction (49 percent in 2010). There is not a significant difference between the level of use in SME’s and larger employers.
• Employers use trial periods to address risk when hiring, for example:
o To check an employee’s ability for the job before making a commitment to employ permanently (66 percent)
o To employ someone with the skills required, but where the business is unsure about their ‘fit’ with the workplace (35 percent)
o To avoid incurring costs if staff are unsuitable for the job (13 percent)

• Employers used trial periods to test the viability of a position (rather than person) within the business, saying they would not have filled their most recently vacant position without a trial period. This was more likely in SME’s (30 percent), compared with 17 percent for larger employers.

• Trial periods improved employment opportunities – 41 percent of employers in the national survey said they would not have hired the most recent employee without a trial period. 
• SME’s were more likely to use trial periods to take a risk – 44 percent of SME’s would not have hired the last trial period employee without the use of a trial period, compared with 28 percent of larger employers. 
• Youth and long-term unemployed are benefitting. Respondents to the qualitative interviews said trial periods were one of the key government initiatives that had improved their willingness to hire applicants from these groups – due to reduction of risk. 
• Eighty percent of employers in the survey reported they had continued employing staff once the trial period had ended. . This is similar to the level found in the 2010 evaluation of trial periods in SME’s.

Labour Minister Kate Wilkinson, is justified in welcoming this news:

“Research by NZIER has previously told us that 90-day trials led to 13,000 new jobs in small and medium sized businesses,” Ms Wilkinson says.

“This latest research confirms trial periods allow employers to take on new staff, with the majority retaining their staff after the trial period is over. That’s great to see.

“The 90-day trials have been especially beneficial for young people and the long-term unemployed. it’s of clear benefit to both employers and employees.”

The opposition and unions fought against this legislation but these findings show it is working for employers and employees. 

 Businesses  face less risk when taking on new staff and they are taking on more staff including those least likely to get work without the safety net of a trial period, the long-term unemployed and young people, because of that.

Rather than opening the door to exploitation as the left prophesied the legislation has reduced risk for businesses and increased employment opportunities which is exactly what is was designed to do.


June 28 in history

June 28, 2012

1098  Fighters of the First Crusade defeated Kerbogha of Mosul.

1389  Ottomans defeated Serbian army in the bloody Battle of Kosovo, opening the way for the Ottoman conquest of Southeastern Europe.

1491 Henry VIII was born  (d. 1547).

1519  Charles V elected emperor of the Holy Roman Empire.

1577 Peter Paul Rubens, Flemish painter, was born (d. 1640).

1635 Guadeloupe became a French colony.

1651  Battle of Beresteczko between Poles and Ukrainians started.

1703 John Wesley, English founder of Methodism, was born (d. 1791).

1712 Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Swiss philosopher, was born (d. 1778).

1776  American Revolutionary War: Carolina Day – commemorates the defense of Fort Moultrie during the Battle of Sullivan’s Island.

1776  American Revolutionary War: Thomas Hickey, Continental Army private and bodyguard to General George Washington, was hanged for mutiny and sedition.

1778 - American Revolutionary War: Battle of Monmouth fought between the American Continental Army under George Washington and the British Army led by Sir Henry Clinton.

1807  Second British invasion of the Río de la Plata; John Whitelock landed at Ensenada on an attempt to recapture Buenos Aires and was defeated by the fierce resistance of the locals.

1838  The coronation of Queen Victoria.

1841 The Théâtre de l’Académie Royale de Musique in Paris premiered the ballet Giselle.

1859  First conformation dog show is held in Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

1865  The Army of the Potomac was disbanded.

1880  Ned Kelly the Australian bushranger was  captured at Glenrowan.

1881 Secret treaty between Austria and Serbia.

1882  Anglo-French Convention of 1882 signed marking territorial boundaries between Guinea and Sierra Leone.

1895  El Salvador, Honduras and Nicaragua formed the Central American Union.

1896  An explosion in the Newton Coal Company’s Twin Shaft Mine in Pittston City, resulted in a massive cave-in that killed 58 miners.

1902 Richard Rodgers, American composer, was born (d. 1979).

1902  The U.S. Congress passed the Spooner Act, authorising President Theodore Roosevelt to acquire rights from Colombia for the Panama Canal.

1904  The SS Norge ran aground and sank.

1909 Eric Ambler, English writer, was born (d. 1998).

1914  Franz Ferdinand, Archduke of Austria and his wife Sophie were assassinated in Sarajevo by young Serbian nationalist Gavrilo Princip, the casus belli of World War I.

1919  The Treaty of Versailles was signed in Paris, formally ending World War I between Belgium, Britain, France, Italy, the United States and allies on the one side and Germany and Austria Hungary on the other side.

1922  The Irish Civil War began with the shelling of the Four Courts in Dublin by Free State forces.

1926 Mel Brooks, American filmmaker, was born.

1928  Harold Evans, English journalist and writer; editor of The Sunday Times, was born.

1936  The Japanese puppet state of Mengjiang was formed in northern China.

1940 Romania ceded Bessarabia (current-day Moldova) to the Soviet Union.

1948  Cominform circulated the “Resolution on the situation in the Communist Party of Yugoslavia”; Yugoslavia was expelled from the Communist bloc.

1948  Boxer Dick Turpin beat Vince Hawkins to become the first black British boxing champion in the modern era.

1950  Seoul was captured by troops from North Korea.

1954  A. A. Gill, British writer and columnist, was born.

1956  Protests and demonstrations in Poznań.

1964  Malcom X formed the Organization of Afro-American Unity.

1967  Israel annexed East Jerusalem.

1969  Stonewall riots began in New York City.

1971 Louise Bagshawe, British novelist and politician, was born.

1973 HMNZS Otago sailed for the Mururoa nuclear test zone.

1973  Elections were held for the Northern Ireland Assembly, which led to power-sharing between unionists and nationalists in Northern Ireland for the first time.

1976  The Angolan court sentenced US and UK mercenaries to death sentences and prison terms in the Luanda Trial.

1978  The United States Supreme Court, in Regents of the University of California v. Bakke barred quota systems in college admissions.

1981  A powerful bomb exploded in Tehran, killing 73 officials of Islamic Republic Party.

1983  The Mianus River Bridge collapsed killing 3 drivers in their vehicles.

1986  ¡A Luchar! held its first congress in Bogotá.

1990  Paperback Software International Ltd. found guilty by a U.S. court of copyright violation for copying the appearance and menu system of Lotus 1-2-3 in its competing spreadsheet program.

1992  The Constitution of Estonia was signed into law.

1994  Members of the Aum Shinrikyo cult released sarin gas attack at Matsumoto, 7 persons killed, 660 injured.

1996  The Constitution of Ukraine was signed into law.

1997 Mike Tyson vs Evander Holyfield II – Tyson was disqualified in the 3rd round for biting a piece from Holyfield’s ear.

2004  Sovereign power was handed to the interim government of Iraq by the Coalition Provisional Authority, ending the U.S.-led rule of that nation.

2005 War in Afghanistan: Three U.S. Navy SEALs and 16 American Special Operations Forces soldiers were killed during Operation Red Wing, a failed counter-insurgent mission in Kunar province.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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