Jock Hobbs

March 13, 2012

One of the most moving moments of the Rugby World Cup was Jock Hobbs presenting Richie McCaw with his 100th test cap.

It was obvious then that Hobbs was very ill and it is testament to his strong will that he not only watched the All Blacks win their second World Cup but was on the stage for the presentation.

Today, far too soon, the final whistle blew for him.

His death is a loss for New Zealand and for rugby and even more so for his family and friends to whom my sympathy goes.

Keeping Stock writes an eloquent tribute here.


Word of the day

March 13, 2012

Desultory – having no set plan or purpose; haphazard or random; erratic; inconsistent; wandering from one thing to another.


No miracle cure

March 13, 2012

Quote of the day:

So, what will happen if we were to employ quantitative easing in New Zealand?

Two things. Where there are constraints in the economy, inflation. No question. A short-term fall in interest rates will feed into house price inflation faster than a real estate agent can sneeze. Asset prices, all asset prices, will rise. This will mean that those with savings denominated in New Zealand dollars will be poorer, those with assets denominated in shares, property or other affected assets, will benefit.

Where there are no constraints in the economy, such as employment, wages and prices will stagnate. Meaning those people will be poorer relative to those benefitting from an increase in asset prices. There will not be any rush of new spending.

This is a redistribution of wealth, from savers to borrowers, from workers to speculators, from the frugal to the feckless. Damien Grant


Whoops

March 13, 2012

Did the Herald really mean to put this headline with this picture:

NZ Labour Party

Prime Minister Joh Key. Photo / Mark Mitchell 

‘Super ministry’ likely in portfolios merger


Act in haste . . .

March 13, 2012

Labour leader David Shearer had to make his mark in his Q&A interview on Sunday but he’s done it for the wrong reasons.

His proposed changes to the law on foreign ownership were a rushed response to the xenophobic reaction to the sale of the Crafar farms, so rushed it has some glaring errors.

Alex Tarrant pointed out yesterday that the media release gave the proposed Bill two different names and also:

In the rush to get this Bill written before Shearer appeared on Q&A on Sunday, you managed to indicate that you would repeal all environmental, heritage, conservation and walking access requirements on foreign landowners for Ministers when making their decisions.

Now I know you didn’t mean to do this – you told me so this morning – but if you’re going to go on national television and announce you’re presenting a member’s Bill to change one of this country’s laws, then I for one would be hoping you’ve given it serious consideration, had a few people look over it, and had another look at the actual legislation to figure out what you’ll be repealing.

Today Derek Cheng says:

The present law lists a number of factors ministers can consider in determining whether the bid would bring “substantial and identifiable” benefit to New Zealand. Among the factors are protection for native flora and fauna, heritage and cultural sites, and wildlife and walking access.

But Mr Shearer’s bill would wipe these factors completely, effectively meaning an application that ticked the box for more exports but destroyed the environment could get the green light.

He said yesterday there was never any intention to remove environmental protections. “And there may in fact be other issues raised at select committee that we would end up including in the bill too.

Of course there wasn’t any intention to remove these protections but mistakes like this look sloppy. They take attention from the proposal to yet another example of Labour looking like a poorly performing opposition rather than a government in waiting.

When you act in haste you get time to repent at leisure.


Top man picks top lamb

March 13, 2012

Prime Minister John Key helped 2011 Supercross World Cup Champion Sarah Walker, 2012 Beef + Lamb New Zealand Ambassador Chef Ben Batterbury and Chief Judge & Invercargill chef Graham Hawkes pick the country’s top lamb.

The arduous job of judging the best of the 20 best barbequed lamb samples in Beef + Lamb’s annual Glammies  (Golden Lamb Awards) took place at the Upper Clutha A&P Show on Friday.

John Key & Graham Hawkes

Watching the competition unfold, Minister of Primary Industries, Hon David Carter says that this competition shows the high quality of our New Zealand lamb.

“In my own experience, judging the Glammies has to be one of the toughest tasks around.  Luckily it’s also one of the tastiest!  The high standard achieved here today proves once again the supreme quality of lamb produced by our farmers.  It’s also great to see that this year’s competition attracted a record number of entries.”

Lamb fans - PM John Key and David Carter

 

Don Morrison of Gore with their Growbulk lamb was named 2012 Beef + Lamb New Zealand Golden Lamb Awards Grand Champion, taking home a cheque for $2000, the Glammies Grand Champion Trophy and a magnum of Mt Difficulty Pinot Noir. The winners of each class received $500 and a bottle of Mt Difficulty Pinot Noir, and each finalist won a plaque showing their placing.

Countdown South Island was awarded the Champion Meat Retailer trophy and Alliance Mataura was named the winning processor.

The 2012 Golden Lamb Awards (aka Glammies), sponsored by Pfizer Animal Genetics, attracted a record 150 entries which all underwent testing at Carne Technologies. Factors such as tenderness, colour and succulence were tested to determine the top twenty finalists tasted in Wanaka.

The full results were:

Class 1 – Dual Purpose

  • 1st: Don Morrison, Gore (Growbulk) processed at Alliance Mataura
  • 2nd: Pete Swinburn & Bruce Isles, Waipukurau (Composite/Perendale) processed at Silver Fern Farms Takapau
  • 3rd: Patrick Sherriff, Gisborne (Perendale/Coopworth) processed at Silver Fern Farms Takapau
  • 4th: Roger & Allison Thomas, Tuatapere (Perendale Texel X/Perendale) processed at Silver Fern Farms Finegand

Class 2 – Dual Purpose X Terminal

  • 1st: James Crutchley, Palmerston (Texel Romney X/South Dorset Down) processed at Blue Sky Meats
  • 2nd: Hamish Pavey, Christchurch (Romney/Suffolk Texel) processed at Silver Fern Farms Fairton
  • 3rd: Robert & Rosemary Gardyne, Winton (Perendale Texel X) processed at Alliance Mataura
  • 4th: Colin Lockhart, Lawrence (Romney/Texel Suffolk) processed at Alliance Mataura

Class 3 – Composite/Crossbreed X Terminal

  • 1st: Sarah Rodie, Amberley (Texel X/Texel) processed at Harris Meats
  • 2nd: Graeme Dodd, Tuatapere (Texel Romney X/Texel) processed at Alliance Mataura
  • 3rd: Murray & Jan Wards, Gore (Textra/Textra Suffolk) processed at Alliance Mataura
  • 4th: Wendy & Leon Black, Riverton (Textra/Texel) processed at Alliance Mataura

Class 4 – Open

  • 1st: William Oliver, Te Kuiti (Perendale Romney X/Landlord Romney) processed at Silver Fern Farms Waitotara
  • 2nd: Graham Clarke, Gore (Romney/Romney) processed at Silver Fern Farms Finegand
  • 3rd: Brian Thomson, Mosgiel (Perendale/South Suffolk Texel) processed at Silver Fern Farms Finegand
  • 4th: Matt Wyeth, Masterton (Highlander/Primera) processed at Silver Fern Farms Takapau

Class 5 – Retail

  • 1st: Progressive Enterprises Ltd (Countdown South Island)
  • 2nd: Harris Meats, Cheviot (Murray Downs)
  • 3rd: Progressive Enterprises Ltd (Countdown South Island)
  • 4th: Harris Meats, Cheviot (Murray Downs)

 


Why no uproar?

March 13, 2012

Could someone please explain to me why the thought of selling a relatively few hectares of farmland to foreigners upsets so many people but there’s no uproar at the news that a German company has OIO approval to buy Turners and Growers?

Germany’s BayWa Atiengesellschaft has secured Overseas Investment Office approval for its takeover of local fruit marketer Turners & Growers, and has declared its offer unconditional.

The German company, which has global investments across the building, energy and agriculture sectors, has bought some 72.5 percent of T&G shares at a cost of about $157 million and will close its offer today, it said in a statement.

“The takeover is a ground-breaking step towards internationalisation of BayWa,” the company said.

Group chief executive Klaus Josef Lutz will take T&G’s chair, and the company will appoint chief financial officer Andreas Helber, board member responsible for agriculture and fruit Josef Krapf, and head of fruit Dietmar Bahler to the board.

Why does the possible sale of land exercise the xenophobes when the sale of a company which owns Enza, New Zealand’s largest apple exporter and one of the country’s signature brands does not?

Owners of farms can’t take the land away but owners of this company could take the produce, the brand and of course the profits.

I’m not opposed to sale of either land or the company but I really don’t understand why people who oppose foreign ownership of farms aren’t just as upset by the sale of companies.


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