Give Me Back My Man

February 28, 2010

Happy birthday Cindy Wilson – 53 today.

This is for Andrei, without whose request I’d never have known about this song.


You Can’t Always Get What You Want

February 28, 2010

Brian Jones would have been 68 today.


Steptoe and Son

February 28, 2010

Harry H. Corbett w.ould have been 85 today.


Did you see the one about

February 28, 2010

If homeopathy beats science  at Forthesakeofscience – Hat Tip: Grant Jacobs at Sciblogs

For control freaks - Quote Unquote has a couple of remote controls which might save a relationship.

Safety at Work - Something Should Go Here with a sign every workplace needs.

Judges could discourage dopey court lies - Stephen Franks has a sensible suggestion.

More Naps - Offsetting Behaviour on how long you should nap for and how siestas help memory.

Full Cream Fifties - Opposable Thumb on  cholesterol’s influence on music.

Let’s get some perspective on mining – Whaleoil puts the numbers into pictures.

Key to Victory - Liberation has a series of posts analysing the 2008 election.


Funsandel

February 28, 2010

The sign at the entrance to the town usually says Dunsandel but last time I drove through someone had changed the D to a F.

There wasn’t much fun about Dunsandel a few years ago, it was just another of the blink-and-you-miss-it towns on the journey to and from Christchurch.

Then the Dunsandel Store had a rebirth, selling delicious, fresh food and some of the best value for money ice creams on State Highway 1.

We often stop there and I’ve yet to be disappointed in the quality of the food.

But I do have one question – who put the door handle on and why did s/he put it so low?


Vegetarians not so green?

February 28, 2010

Vegetables good – meat bad. That’s what we keep being told by people wanting us to save the planet by going vegetarian,

But a study by the World Wildlife Fund has found that the environmental impact of growing some meat substitutes are worse than that from raising animals.

It has often been claimed that avoiding red meat is beneficial to the environment, because it lowers emissions and less land is used to produce alternatives.

But a study by Cranfield University, commissioned by WWF, the environmental group, found a substantial number of meat substitutes – such as soy, chickpeas and lentils – were more harmful to the environment because they were imported into Britain from overseas.

Far be it for me to stick up for anyone advocating we all give up meat, but this is the food miles argument which Lincoln University proved doesn’t necessarily stack up.

How far produce travels is only one factor. Lincoln’s study found New Zealand’s free range meat had a smaller environmental footprint even when transport was accounted for than meat from intensively farmed animals sold on local markets.

The study concluded: “A switch from beef and milk to highly refined livestock product analogues such as tofu could actually increase the quantity of arable land needed to supply the UK.”

The results showed that the amount of foreign land required to produce the substitute products – and the potential destruction of forests to make way for farmland – outweighed the negatives of rearing beef and lamb in the UK.

An increase in vegetarianism could result in the collapse of British farming, the study warned, causing meat production to move overseas where there may be less legal protection of forests and uncultivated land.

Meat substitutes were also found to be highly processed, often requiring large amounts of energy to produce. The study recognised that the environmental merits of vegetarianism depended largely on which types of foods were consumed as an alternative to meat.

It’s good to see an environmental group taking the trouble to investigate claims that vegetarian diets are better for the planet than those which include meat and that the study looked at the economic impact a mass conversion to vegetarianism would have.

This study shows that working out the green credentials of any produce is a complex business and being vegetarian isn’t necessarily better for the environment than eating meat.


February 28 in history

February 28, 2010

On February 28:

20 BC coronation ceremony of Liu Bang as Emperor Gaozu of Han takes place, initiating four centuries of the Han Dynasty‘s rule over China.

870 The Fourth Council of Constantinople closed.

 
Council Trent.jpg

1261 Margaret of Scotland, queen of Norway, was born.

1638 The Scottish National Covenant was signed in Edinburgh.

 

1710  In the Battle of Helsingborg, 14,000 Danish invaders under Jørgen Rantzau were decisively defeated by an equally sized Swedish force under Magnus Stenbock.

Battle of Helsingborg print.jpg

1784 John Wesley chartered the Methodist Church.

 

1787 The charter establishing the institution now known as the University of Pittsburgh was granted.

University of Pittsburgh Seal

1824 Blondin, French tightrope walker, was born.

 

1827  The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad was incorporated, becoming the first railroad in America offering commercial transportation of both people and freight.

Francis Blackwell Mayer. The Founders of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (1891), represents the B&O’s history (left to right) beginning with its founding in 1827 to 1880. Philip E. Thomas, George Brown, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, and others are gathered at left. Samuel F. B. Morse is seated at center left (with telegraph tape) and John W. Garrett is seated at right.

1838 Robert Nelson, leader of the Patriotes, proclaimed the independence of Lower Canada (today Québec).

 

1844 A gun on USS Princeton exploded while the boat was on a Potomac River cruise, killing eight people, including two United States Cabinet members.

USS Princeton, Lithograph by N. Currier, New York, 1844.
 

1849 Regular steamboat service from the west to the east coast of the United States began with the arrival of the SS California in San Francisco Bay, 4 months 21 days after leaving New York Harbour.

1865 Wilfred Grenfell, medical missionary, was born.

 

1870 The Bulgarian Exarchate was established by decree of Sultan Abd-ul-Aziz of the Ottoman Empire.

 

1883 The first vaudeville theatre opened in Boston, Massachusetts.

1897 Queen Ranavalona III, the last monarch of Madagascar, was deposed by a French military force.

Queen Ranavalona III

1900 The Second Boer War: The 118-day “Siege of Ladysmith” was lifted.

Ladysmith Town Hall 1900 - Project Gutenberg eText 15972.png

1912 Clara Petacci, Italian mistress of Benito Mussolini, was born.

1914 The Autonomous Republic of Northern Epirus was proclaimed in Gjirokastër, by the Greeks living in southern Albania.

1922 The United Kingdom accepted the independence of Egypt.

1925 Harry H Corbett, English actor, was born.

PicSteptoeAndSon.jpg

1928  C.V. Raman discovered Raman effect.

1933 Gleichschaltung: The Reichstag Fire Decree was passed in Germany a day after the Reichstag fire.

Flag of Nazi Germany

1935 DuPont scientist Wallace Carothers invented Nylon.

Nylon 

1939 The first issue of Serbian weekly magazine Politikin zabavnik was published.

 

1939 – The erroneous word “Dord” is discovered in the Webster’s New International Dictionary, Second Edition, prompting an investigation.

1942 Brian Jones, English musician (The Rolling Stones), was born.

1942 The heavy cruiser USS Houston (CA-30) was sunk in the Battle of Sunda Strait with 693 crew members killed.

USS Houston

1943 Charles Bernstein, American composer, was born.

1945 New Zealand soldier David Russell was executed by a Nazi firing squad in Italy.

Kiwi soldier faces Nazi firing squad

1946 Robin Cook, British politician, was born.

1947 228 Incident: In Taiwan, civil disorder is put down with the loss of 30,000 civilian lives.

 The 228 Monument located near the Presidential Office in Taipei

1953 Paul Krugman, American economist, Nobel laureate, was born.

Paul Krugman-press conference Dec 07th, 2008-8.jpg

1957 Cindy Wilson, American singer (The B-52’s), was born.

1958 A school bus in Floyd County, Kentucky hits a wrecker truck and plunged down an embankment into the rain-swollen Levisa Fork River. The driver and 26 children died in what remains the worst school bus accident in U.S. history.

1970 Daniel Handler, American writer, better known as Lemony Snicket, was born.

1972 The Asama-Sanso incident ended in Japan.

1972 The United States and People’s Republic of China signed the Shanghai Communiqué.

1974 Moana Mackey, New Zealand politician, was born.

1975 A major tube train crash at Moorgate station, London kills 43 people.

Moorgate station

1985 The Provisional Irish Republican Army carried out a mortar attack on the Royal Ulster Constabulary police station at Newry, killing nine officers in the highest loss of life for the RUC on a single day.

1986 Olof Palme, Prime Minister of Sweden  was assassinated in Stockholm.

1991 The first Gulf War ended.

1993 Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agents raided the Branch Davidian church in Waco, Texas with a warrant to arrest the group’s leader David Koresh. Four BATF agents and five Davidians die in the initial raid, starting a 51-day standoff.

 

1995 Denver International Airport officially opened in Denver, Colorado to replace Stapleton International Airport

DiaLogo.png
DIA Airport Roof.jpg

1997 – The North Hollywood shootout takes place.

1998 – First flight of RQ-4 Global Hawk, the first unmanned aerial vehicle certified to file its own flight plans and fly regularly in U.S. civilian airspace.

 

1998 – Kosovo War: Serbian police begin the offensive against the Kosovo Liberation Army in Kosovo.

2001 – The Nisqually Earthquake measuring 6.8 on the Richter Scale hits the Nisqually Valley and the Seattle, Tacoma, and Olympia area of the U.S. state of Washington.

2001 – Six passengers and four railway staff are killed and a further 82 people suffer serious injuries in the Selby rail crash.

200 More than 1 million Taiwanese participating in the 228 Hand-in-Hand Rally formed a 500-kilometre (300-mile) long human chain to commemorate the 228 Incident in 1947.

 

2005 Lebanon‘s pro-Syrian prime minister, Omar Karami, resigned amid large anti-Syria street demonstrations in Beirut.

2005 A suicide bombing at a police recruiting centre in Al Hillah, Iraq killed 127.

2007  Jupiter flyby of the New Horizons Pluto-observer spacecraft.

New Horizons

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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