More to Moeraki than boulders and seafood

December 31, 2008

The Moeraki boulders have always attracted visitors and Fleurs Place in the township has added to the reasons to stop.

However, the ODT shows there are other reasons for a visit.


He´s earned the QSM

December 31, 2008

North Otago retired farmer Lindsay Malcolm has more than earned the QSM he was awarded in the New Year honours.

He was born, brought up and farmed in the Enfield district where he was involved in a wide variety of community organisations including Young Farmers, Federated Farmers, school and hall committees and church.

He was also active further afield as North Otago president of Federated Farmers, chair of Network Waitaki, on the electoral college of the Meat and Wool Board and a member of the meat board.

His membership of comittees wasn´t just a token gesture, if he was involved at all he was committed to doing his best.

He has a keen interest in local history and with the help of a cousin, turned the letters his father wrote home when serving overseas in WWI into a fascinating book. Since then he also published a photographic history of the Enfield District and recently published a family history.


Inconsiderate drivers

December 30, 2008

inconsiderate-driving


If only . . .

December 29, 2008

. . .  Noah had left the rabbits behind because there is at least one large family in my garden, in spite of the presence of Pepper a Labrador/sheep dog cross with a penchant for chasing small, furry creatures.

I wouldn’t mind so much if they liked weeds but they’re more partial to flowers and are particularly fond of sweet peas.

noah


Over packaged

December 28, 2008

Why does the wee camera memory card sitting on the ruler need all the packaging that’s sitting beside it?

memory


Summer recipe #9

December 28, 2008

 

Mother’s Delight

Take one mother and place gently in hammock in sheltered spot.

Baste with sun screen.

Add several books and a selection of magazines.

Mix cool drinks and pour in at regular intervals to prevent dehydration.

Leave in peace until completely mellow.

NB – Mixture tends to curdle if shaken or stirred before properly rested.


Confession about the tree

December 27, 2008

Several people have left comments about the Christmas tree saga so I´d better confess it was based – somewhat loosely – on fact but there was a fair bit of literary licence.

To those who left comments, and all the other visitors to Homepaddock, I hope you had as happy and a relaxed Christmas as we did and that 2009 is especially kind to you and yours.


The best week of the year

December 27, 2008

This is my favourite week of the year.

It’s far too late to worry about whatever is left on the things-to-do-this year list and too soon to do any more than think about the things to put on next year’s list.

There’s usually enough left overs from Christmas so preparing meals is easy and if there’s a need to cook it’s most likely to be on a barbeque.

If the weather co-operates we might head for the hills, river or lake and if it doesn’t I’ll have my nose in a book.

If Father Christmas heard my hints I’ll  have several books to read, in case he didn’t there’ll be some on my not-yet-read shelf and if all else fails I’ll re-read some old favourites.

Bliss.


Saturday’s smiles

December 27, 2008

This can’t all be blamed on Christmas dinner.

scales


Summer recipe #8

December 26, 2008

 

Summer Stew

Take one or two stressed parents.

Add several pressing work commitments, a long list of things-to-do-before-leaving and mix with holiday preparations.

Throw in a couple of last-minute hitches.

Top with several over-excited chidlren.

Place everything in cramped car and allow to simmer for several hours on crowded road.

When properaly stewed, remove family from heat, settle at the beach and immerse in fresh or salt water until cool.


Summer recipe #7

December 25, 2008

 

Family Flambe

Take at least three generations to ensure generous assortment of grandparents, parents, aunts, uncles and offspring.

Throw in a handful of in-laws and mix with a few family friends.

Mariante in old memories spiced with a few new stories.

Stir occasionall to mix, taking care not to let old grievances come to the surface.

If mixture threatens to boil over, lighten with laughter and restore humour with large quanitities of tolerance and love.


All I want for Christmas

December 25, 2008

jock1

from The Best of Jock by David Hensaw, published by Hodder & Stoughton.


Summer recipe #6

December 25, 2008

 

Christmas Mooslie

Take a large herd of lactating cows and pour into dairy shed at dawn.

Add a worker and milk until cows are empty.

Wash down shed.

Turn cows out on to paddock.

Shift irrigator.

Repeat process in the afternoon.

Retire to bed early and dream of future when can pay someone else to work over Christmas.


Christmas

December 25, 2008

Christmas

I see a twinkle in your eye, so this shall be my Christmas star and I will travel to your heart: the manager where the real things are.

And I will find a mother there who holds you gently to her breast, a father to protect your peace, and by these things you shall be blessed.

And you will always be reborn and I will always see the star and make the journey to your heart: the manager where the real things are.

- Michael Leunig –


Summer recipe # 5

December 24, 2008

 

Christmas Eve Special

Take one church, any size, and fill with people.

Add a selection of carols and season with readings and prayer.

Infuse with the spirit of hope, joy, peace and love.

Leave to meditate before turning out on the world.


Dear Father Christmas #7

December 24, 2008

Dear Father Christmas

What can I say but thanks for bringing me what that power toy I asked for last year?

Mastering it is going to take me a while so I’m pleased it came with training wheels.

And while some of the others in my team thought it would’ve been even better if we didn’t have to share it, they admit playing with the others can be fun.

Since you were so generous last year I don’t want to ask for too much this time, but if you had any economic miracles to spare for the country that would be great.

Yours with a grin

John


One day before Christmas

December 24, 2008

Twelve days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “If the wind keeps up the lucerne should be fit by mid-afternoon so we’ll start making hay and there could be a few extra men for tea. But if there’s time when we finish I’ll get the Christmas tree.”

 

Eleven days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “I’m going through to a sale in Central. I should be back in time for the school concert, though probably not in time to get the Christmas tree.”

 

Ten days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “When you go into town this morning could you see if the spare part for the tractor has turned up yet, pick up some drench, drop a few cheques into the bank then pay these bills, there’s only two or three. While you’re doing that I’ll get the Christmas tree”

 

Nine days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “We’ll be shearing today, one of the men will be in the shed so he’ll want lunch early, the other should be in at the usual time and I probably won’t be in ‘til after one. But if we get the irrigator fixed this afternoon there might be time to get the Christmas tree.”

 

Eight days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “One of the rousies didn’t turn up so I’ve had to get another at short notice. Would you mind giving her lunch and could you throw something together for her morning and afternoon tea? If there’s no problems getting the sheep in I should have time to get the Christmas tree”

 

Seven days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “The farm advisor’s coming for a look round this morning and I’ll be working with cattle all afternoon, but if the phone’s quiet after dinner I’ll go and get the Christmas tree.”

 

Six days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “I’m going to the sale this morning and it’ll take most of the afternoon to draft the lambs. But they shouldn’t need dagging so when we’ve loaded the truck I’ll have time to get the Christmas tree.”

 

Five days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “If the rain holds off we’ll make a start on the silage this afternoon but it’s almost mid-summer’s day so  if it’s still be light enough to see when we knock off  I should be able to get the Christmas tree.”

 

Four days before Christmas my farmers said to me, “We’ll be making silage again today. It would save time if you could bring lunch out to the paddock and we’ll probably want dinner too – but if we finish early then I’ll go and get the tree.”

 

Three days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “Could you pick up the irrigator hose from the carriers? I won’t have time to do any shopping now so when you’re in town why don’t you choose yourself something and charge it up to me? And while you’re away I’ll get the Christmas tree.”

 

Two days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “Are you all organised for the staff party? When I’ve finished drenching those lambs I’ll have to shift the irrigator but I’ll be able to give you a hand after that if I get everything done quickly, oh and of course I will get the Christmas tree.”

 

One day before Christmas my farmer said to me, “The motorbike ran out of petrol in the back paddock. Could come up in the ute to pick me up and if you bring the chain saw with you we could detour on the way back to get the Christmas tree.”

 

 


Dear Father Christmas # 6

December 23, 2008

Kia Ora Father Christmas,

You came early this year and the power toy you gave us is keeping us all entertained – and busy.

We’re quite happy to share it although it might take us a while to work out exactly how it works, especially when we’re playing with the others.

They’ve all been very nice, including us like whanau, they didn’t even seem to mind when we didn’t want to play on their side the other day.

So all we really want this Christmas is more of the same, thanks.

Arohanui

Tariana and Pita


Two days before Christmas

December 23, 2008

 

Twelve days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “If the wind keeps up the lucerne should be fit by mid-afternoon so we’ll start making hay and there could be a few extra men for tea. But if there’s time when we finish I’ll get the Christmas tree.”

 

Eleven days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “I’m going through to a sale in Central. I should be back in time for the school concert and if I’m early I’ll get the Christmas tree.”

 

Ten days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “When you go into town this morning could you see if the spare part for the tractor has turned up yet, pick up some drench, drop a few cheques into the bank then pay these bills, there’s only two or three. While you’re doing that I’ll get the Christmas tree”

 

Nine days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “We’ll be shearing today, one of the men will be in the shed so he’ll want lunch early, the other should be in at the usual time and I probably won’t be in ‘til after one. But if we get the irrigator fixed this afternoon there might be time to get the Christmas tree.”

 

Eight days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “One of the rousies didn’t turn up so I’ve had to get another at short notice. Would you mind giving her lunch and could you throw something together for her morning and afternoon tea? If there’s no problems getting the sheep in I should have time to get the Christmas tree”

 

Seven days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “The farm advisor’s coming for a look round this morning and I’ll be working with cattle all afternoon, but if the phone’s quiet after dinner I’ll go and get the Christmas tree.”

 

Six days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “I’m going to the sale this morning and it’ll take most of the afternoon to draft the lambs. But they shouldn’t need dagging so when we’ve loaded the truck I’ll have time to get the Christmas tree.”

 

Five days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “If the rain holds off we’ll make a start on the silage this afternoon but it’s almost mid-summer’s day so  if it’s still be light enough to see when we knock off  I should be able to get the Christmas tree.”

 

Four days before Christmas my farmers said to me, “We’ll be making silage again today. It would save time if you could bring lunch out to the paddock and we’ll probably want dinner too – but if we finish early then I’ll go and get the tree.”

 

Three days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “Could you pick up the irrigator hose from the carriers? I won’t have time to do any shopping now so when you’re in town why don’t you choose yourself something and charge it up to me? And while you’re away I’ll get the Christmas tree.”

 

Two days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “Are you all organised for the staff party? When I’ve finished drenching those lambs I’ll have to shift the irrigator but I’ll be able to give you a hand after that if I get everything done quickly, oh and I’d better get the tree.”


Three days before Christmas

December 22, 2008

Twelve days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “If the wind keeps up the lucerne should be fit by mid-afternoon so we’ll start making hay and there could be a few extra men for tea. But if there’s time when we finish I’ll get the Christmas tree.”

 

Eleven days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “I’m going through to a sale in Central. I should be back in time for the school concert and if I’m early I’ll get the Christmas tree.”

 

Ten days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “When you go into town this morning could you see if the spare part for the tractor has turned up yet, pick up some drench, drop a few cheques into the bank then pay these bills, there’s only two or three. While you’re doing that I’ll get the Christmas tree”

 

Nine days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “We’ll be shearing today, one of the men will be in the shed so he’ll want lunch early, the other should be in at the usual time and I probably won’t be in ‘til after one. But if we get the irrigator fixed this afternoon there might be time to get the Christmas tree.”

 

Eight days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “One of the rousies didn’t turn up so I’ve had to get another at short notice. Would you mind giving her lunch and could you throw something together for her morning and afternoon tea? If there’s no problems getting the sheep in I should have time to get the Christmas tree”

 

Seven days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “The farm advisor’s coming for a look round this morning and I’ll be working with cattle all afternoon, but if the phone’s quiet after dinner I’ll go and get the Christmas tree.”

 

Six days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “I’m going to the sale this morning and it’ll take most of the afternoon to draft the lambs. But they shouldn’t need dagging so when we’ve loaded the truck I’ll have time to get the Christmas tree.”

 

Five days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “If the rain holds off we’ll make a start on the silage this afternoon but it’s almost mid-summer’s day so  if it’s still be light enough to see when we knock off  I should be able to get the Christmas tree.”

 

Four days before Christmas my farmers said to me, “We’ll be making silage again today. It would save time if you could bring lunch out to the paddock and we’ll probably want dinner too – but if we finish early then I’ll go and get the tree.”

 

Three days before Christmas my farmer said to me, “Could you pick up the irrigator hose from the carriers? I won’t have time to do any shopping now so when you’re in town why don’t you choose yourself something and charge it up to me? And while you’re doing that I’ll get the Christmas tree”


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